2,550 reputation
1425
bio website noldorin.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen yesterday

entrepreneur; graduate in mathematics / theoretical computer science / theoretical physics; polymath-in-training

based in London, United Kingdom


Jun
13
comment Is treason ever successful?
I don't know what you're talking about with respect to the Graeco-Persian wars. It was a pyrrhic victory for the Persians, without doubt; followed by decisive Greek victories in the next decades.
May
21
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
Heh you're probably right, yeah... I guess it just felt like a response to your answer. Plus, it's been so long... The Italo-Celtic theory is out of favour, really? I always rather liked it too. Must have happened in the past decade, else I have been reading very out-of-date sources!
May
21
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
By the way, I just sort of realised I'm answering my own question here! I asked this some time ago, and I've learnt a bit in the meanwhile. The above can be interpreted as the extent of my best knowledge, presently. In any case, thank you for your answer; it sheds some additional light on what I already know. :) The only thing I explicitly disagree with is the Old Welsh origin for "Gaelic"; I think the etymology is far more ancient...
May
21
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
The Brythonics of course also originated from the continental Celts (by geographical necessity), probably from northern France/Belgium into Britain. This migration probably predates the Gaelic migration to Ireland slightly (which is thought to have occurred no earlier than 1000 BC I believe).
May
21
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
Yeah, don't get me wrong, I'm not so much correcting as elaborating on some of the points that I thought were vague or could do with some discussion. :) The origin of the Celts is a tricky matter; it's generally thought the Italo-Celtic branch separated from the Germanic/Slavic/Baltic branch somewhere in central-eastern Europe, after which the Italic peoples migrated south into the Italian penninsula and the Celts spread out everywhere, but primarily migrated West. The Gaels specifically seem to be an off-shoot of the continental Celts, and closely related to the Celtiberians perhaps.
May
21
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
The best current theory for the origin of the Gaelic peoples is that originated somewhere in northern Spain and/or southern France during the westward migrations of the Celts in the 2nd and 1st millennia B.C. From these areas, they later spread to Ireland and finally Scotland.
May
21
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
Galician is indeed a Romance language, but the culture and ethnicity of the region was historically strongly Celtic, and remains rather Celtic even to this day. They lost their native Celtic tongue along with other Celtic peoples in (northern) Iberia when the Romans conquered the peninsula. Before this, there is evidence of them speaking the "Gallaecian" language, a continental Celtic language.
May
21
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
There are a few problems with this answer. Gaelic/Goidelic/Gaulish/Gallic/Galatian/etc. (probably even 'Celtic') are all cognate, and the base word originates as an endonym for the Celtic peoples, that goes back very far indeed. The Ancient Greeks recorded "Galatians" in Anatolia. This was long before civilised Europe had any contact with Wales or the Welsh language. Certainly, the root etymology of "Gaelic" is far old than the nations of Wales, Ireland, France, etc., and possibly older than the Goidelic-Brythonic split.
Mar
7
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
(contd.) The Empire provided for quick trade routes and efficient communication, hence ideas could have easily spread between the two, especially regarding something as important and pervasive as a nascent religion. Early Irish Christianity was influenced both by the Brythonic form (pre-Anglo Saxon) and continental Christianity to varying degrees.
Mar
7
comment Where did the Gaels originate?
Sure... the Roman Empire encompassed Egypt at the time of early Coptic Christianity, and also Britain, both of which it effectively Christianised. This persisted even after the collapse for a short time time, thanks to Byzantine trade and power. Christianity during the Roman Imperial period was disparate and sectarian, but that doesn't mean there weren't a lot of cross-influences going on.
Mar
5
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
22
comment What language(s) were spoken within the Holy Roman Empire?
@OwenBlacker: Yeah, well we're both getting into fine details here, for sure. Northern Europe east of roughly modern Brandenburg was settled by ethnically and linguistically Slavic (and Baltic) peoples before Germanic folk established a presence there. You're right in saying that the Germans came along later, founded cities, and spread the German language such that it was even dominant in some areas, but for the most part the Slavic character of the region remained. Bohemia had a similar story as far as I know.
Feb
21
comment What language(s) were spoken within the Holy Roman Empire?
@OwenBlacker: Yeah, you make fair points. It's so hard to cover the subtleties of the Empire's languages and the every-changing boundaries and degrees of controls over various regions (throughout a millennium history). During the early Empire -- until the late Middle Ages I believe -- territory encompassed significant Polish speaking areas. Not on the area in the above map (the year ~1600) though, I agree with that.
Feb
20
comment What language(s) were spoken within the Holy Roman Empire?
@Lohoris: Certainly in the High Medieval period. Frederick I and/or Frederick II would have at least possessed nominal control over Genoa, as well probably earlier Holy Roman Empires. The control was never firm though, and Genoa was governed by a largely independent Bishop, with the real power being held by pseudo-Roman elected consuls. As far as I know, at least. :-)
Jan
10
comment Who gave King Richard I the title Coeur de Lion?
Yes quite; thank you for pointing this out. And not to mention the Plantagenets' predecessors the Normans...
Jan
4
comment What are the counterarguments to calling German nazism a right-wing movement?
Left and right wing is always a woolly, ill-defined term, I find. Saying that, I like the definition of Facism as an "extreme centrist" ideology. Nazism is a peculiar and even more extreme brand of Facism, with racial ideologies on top.
Jan
1
comment Who should be the king/queen of England?
@SteveMelnikoff Sorry, you're right. I don't know why I said MPs. I meant ministers.
Jan
1
comment Who should be the king/queen of England?
Direct descendent means nothing. There are plenty of them. Cognatic primogeniture is the key here! Very hard to prove.