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Mar
31
comment When did Greek historians stop believing Greek mythology to be historical fact?
+1. It is only really modern people who get the two mixed up. Ancients all knew the important part of a story was the lessons behind it. The concept of recording past events in a dispassionate logical factual way is relatively new (and really not even conceivable without writing)
Mar
31
revised When did Greek historians stop believing Greek mythology to be historical fact?
Edited to emphasise the point
Mar
31
awarded  Revival
Mar
30
revised What was the first major technological advancement that occurred after the fall of the Roman Empire?
added 5 characters in body
Mar
30
revised What was the first major technological advancement that occurred after the fall of the Roman Empire?
edited body
Mar
30
comment Was there a tax on being fat in Gaul?
First I've heard of it. Presumably this would have to be Roman Gaul. I couldn't dig up anything about a Roman fat tax, but their tax code does appear to be notorious for being complex.
Mar
30
comment Were US exports in the early 1800s paid for with metal or with paper?
I believe the dollar at the time was silver-backed, so the difference would have been a matter of semantics.
Mar
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
29
revised Does the title “On the …” have a historic origin
Giving it a tag for the destination site
Mar
29
comment Does the title “On the …” have a historic origin
I'll try to see to it...
Mar
29
comment When would the Japanese have been able to recognize their archipelago?
Isn't that video wonderful? My 13yo was excitedly showing it to me, and she has never been a history fan. About as accurate as can be hoped for, given the form too.
Mar
29
comment Does the title “On the …” have a historic origin
Given the subject matter, you may want to try this question on the History of Science & Math stack. Hate to get rid of what looks like a really good question, but I think this would be right up their alley.
Mar
26
comment Identification of Aircraft, Weimar, Germany, May, 1945
I certainly am not seeing any means of propulsion.
Mar
26
comment When was the change from kalends, ides and nones to numbers
@Comintern - I wasn't either, but after talking with the HSM mod, I think you have the right of it.
Mar
26
comment When was the change from kalends, ides and nones to numbers
@Comintern - Yes. The mods there informed me they were migrating it here, and suggested we merge the two copies. However, since this one doesn't have any answers from that stack with it...
Mar
26
comment Which year in history had the highest ratio of non-natural deaths?
I remember hearing about this. But wasn't that just for one line? IIRC, you get very different findings when you check the Y Chromosome (inherited only from father to son) and Mitochondrial DNA (inherited only from the maternal line).
Mar
26
comment Which year in history had the highest ratio of non-natural deaths?
Given the question change to one of percentages, this is a better answer.
Mar
26
comment Which year in history had the highest ratio of non-natural deaths?
@GuntramBlohm - Yes, but you're taking the highest estimate (which is quite likely to be an overestimate), and then giving it a boost on one year, for a supportable reason, but mostly because it helps arrive at a number you'd like it to. One should avoid doing that with multiple pieces of information.This is the exact kind of logic that Columbus used to argue Japan was 3,000 miles west of the Canaries, when it was more like 20,000. Far better to use averages so wrong estimates even out.
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
25
comment Which year in history had the highest ratio of non-natural deaths?
@Alex - Disease is specifically listed in the question. If you have an issue with that, you need to comment on the question, not here.