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Mar
19
comment Cattle handling in the 19th century
I actually have some first-hand experience with this, but my grandfather used a corral to help with the separation process. I'd imagine on the free range you'd have to either find a natural barrier to help, and/or make up the difference with extra cowboys (on horseback of course). However, I don't know that, and now you've got me curious too, so +1 for the question.
Mar
19
comment Gender Color Association: When did boys become blue and girls pink?
@JamesRyan - That was my reaction when I first was told that too. But you will most likely search in vain for ancient sources that refer to the sky as blue. For instance, Homer never used the word once anywhere, despite describing the color of the sky in nearly every dang stanza. They just didn't have the sense of that as a color. Strange but true.
Mar
19
awarded  19th-century
Mar
18
revised What does a “boat crimper” do?
added 420 characters in body
Mar
18
answered What does a “boat crimper” do?
Mar
18
comment What does a “boat crimper” do?
Impressively tough question. It even survived an attack from the tactical nuke of English: the OED. I'm going to keep digging, but my guess right now would be that it came into the language as a nautical term from Dutch, so Dutch sources for what krimpen meant shipboard might be productive.
Mar
18
comment Scaffoldings on Taj Mahal?
I'd need a link saying this to upvote it. However, as an argument it makes sense.
Mar
18
revised Destruction of iconic structures in wars of the 20th century and later
added 116 characters in body
Mar
18
comment Destruction of iconic structures in wars of the 20th century and later
This is legit, in that it was deliberately targeted. However, it appears they did have a military reason for doing so (unlike the implication I am reading from this answer). Its possible they were wrong, but it wasn't just targeted for the joy of destroying something, or for political or philosophical reasons.
Mar
18
comment Destruction of iconic structures in wars of the 20th century and later
We are attempting to answer this question under the meta rules for allowing list questions. Under these rules, I must ask you to accept the "community wiki" answer. This will make sure to place it at the top. Failure to do so throws you back to the old rules, which means we may close your question.
Mar
18
revised Destruction of iconic structures in wars of the 20th century and later
deleted 2953 characters in body
Mar
18
comment Destruction of iconic structures in wars of the 20th century and later
If we're going with that proposal, I'm going to edit this down to how I'd pictured it. If doing it this way is inferior, we can always go back. But I don't think we want the entire content of every answer in here twice.
Mar
17
revised When were the most recent Amendments to the boundaries of Boston Ward 3?
added 85 characters in body
Mar
17
revised Buddhists in ancient Alexandria and Rome
added 128 characters in body
Mar
17
answered Buddhists in ancient Alexandria and Rome
Mar
14
comment Why did helmets have this metal thing between the eyes?
I looks like it would be a good way to block slashes to the face, with a minimum of vision obstruction. Yeah, there's some, but its not nearly as much as a full face visor would be, and really is no more than the uncorrected area people who wear glasses have to deal with.
Mar
13
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
13
comment Identify this sword!
From the link, apparently Tuareg warriors have an aversion to touching metal, which explains why not only the hilt but the guard as well appear to be wrapped in leather.
Mar
13
revised Identify this sword!
added 49 characters in body
Mar
13
comment Identify this sword!
The first picture showing the same three blade lines and two squiggles in a semicircle looks pretty darn definitive to me.