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Aug
19
answered What role did War elephants play in the battle of Thermopylae?
Aug
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
16
comment When did we figure out that Venus was too hot for humans?
Locking for a few minutes to let everyone calm down. If you have a fundametal issue with editing or posting philosophy that needs to be hashed out, please take it to meta (and don't make it personal!).
Aug
15
comment Before 1961, what did they think would happen to people in weightlessness?
I was all poised to vote this up, but never came across the actual information. :-(
Aug
14
revised Why did Japan not withdraw from China as its pacific front was crumbling and the threat of US invasion imminent?
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Aug
14
comment Why was the US unable to win in Korea?
Deleted 8 comments here, starting roughly where things started to veer from "clarifying the answer" to "discussion". Not that the dicussion wasn't interesting, but it doesn't belong here. Please take it to chat if you'd like to continue.
Aug
14
comment Is there a symbol associated with Loki from the Norse pantheon?
@LennartRegebro - That is my suspicon as well. However, I had to put it up, or someone else would find one of them and put that up as the sole truth.
Aug
13
comment Did American slave holders typically give their slaves the names of Roman nobility?
Perhaps you realised this, but Cassius Clay was not actually born into slavery. His parents would have picked his first name. Its his last name that likely had it origins in the slave era.
Aug
13
comment Why was the US unable to win in Korea?
@AmericanLuke - I suspect he's thinking of Japan. Not that this would be totally true either...
Aug
13
revised Why did Herzl's attempt to come to a political agreement with the Ottoman rulers of Palestine fail?
edited title
Aug
12
revised Which figure is this a statue of?
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Aug
12
comment How did Germany produce such an impressive portfolio of officers for WW2?
@SchwitJanwityanujit - I'd say yes and no. We clearly know far more about it than we used to. However, by the time the wall came down in the 90's a lot of the principals had died, so there was no longer nearly as much of a chance for follow-up interviews. As a result, we will probably never know the Eastern front in the detail we know the others. Truly sad that, as it is where the most decisive action in the war occurred.
Aug
12
comment Which figure is this a statue of?
David is exactly what I thought too. It is clearly not The David though, as that statue is way larger (17 feet tall) than the one in this shot.
Aug
12
revised Which figure is this a statue of?
added 68 characters in body
Aug
12
comment When and how did English become the Lingua Franca?
@Sardathrion - Is that actually true? There are a rather a lot of former UK possessions out there (eg: India, with nearly a billion people) where the English is either BE, or a local derivative of it unrelated to AmE. Additionally, I notice we AmE speakers don't seem to be much of a majority on the English stack.
Aug
10
comment Was the attack on Pearl Harbor totally unexpected?
Carriers at that time were not considered very important ships by the USA navy. Japan felt differently (and were about to teach the Americans that lesson), but the USA essentially just had them because their opponents had them. So I find it unlikely in the extreme that their absence that day was a result of any clever plan on the USA's part. Hanlon's Razor should be applied here.
Aug
10
revised Why did no Independent American Indian states ever develop?
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Aug
10
revised Why did no Independent American Indian states ever develop?
added 479 characters in body
Aug
9
comment How were British personnel employed in the colonies after independence
@Arani - I would suspect "Cost of Living" was just a dodge, as they weren't exactly commuting back to the UK every night after work. The real reason for pay disparity would have been a combination of market forces and racisim. Racial pay disparities were quite common in that era (For example, I know both the Panama Canal Company and the Transcontinental Railroad paid workers in part based on national origin). In the case of the former American colonies, everyone in question was of the same race, so I'd be surprised if that was an issue there.
Aug
9
comment How did Germany produce such an impressive portfolio of officers for WW2?
Actually, the explanation I always heard back in the day for the lack of fame all things Eastern Front in WWII was that the USSR was not nearly as forthcoming with their wartime military records to researchers as the governments on the other side of the Iron Curtain were. Thus there just wasn't the same level of actual documented information available. I remember a lot of excitement from Historians in the late '80's that the changes in Eastern Europe might finally start to open up eastern european war records to researchers.