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Any man more right than his neighbors constitutes a majority of one.

Henry David Thoreau


Oct
16
comment German influence if the Nazis had won
Have a look at two alternate-history novels: The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick and Fatherland by Robert Harris. Otherwise, I am afraid your question is not in agreement with the site rules -- see the help center -- and will have to be closed.
Oct
15
comment Have famous rabbis ever converted to Islam?
O.K., it is not claimed that Columbus was a Muslim, but there is a widespread claim in Muslim circles that he relied on an Arab book and Muslim navigators to discover the Americas, for which there is no evidence really. It is also a widespread claim that Muslim ships discovered the Americas centuries before Columbus, also without evidence.
Oct
15
comment Which sources should I believe regarding CV-8 Hornet?
Voting to reopen this. Although the latest edit asks a completely different question from the original version, the edit was done by the original poster, which makes it acceptable.
Oct
15
comment Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an notes and declaration of Independence
@Felix Will do, look for a posting from me in the near future.
Oct
15
comment Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an notes and declaration of Independence
If we take the book's blurb as an accurate summary of its content, however, the author is right about one thing: the Enlightenment era did see a fashion craze about things Islamic -- e.g., Mozart's rondo alla turca and Abduction from the Serail -- as well as a concerted attempt mostly by Protestant and Jewish writers to build up an imaginary "Golden Age of Islam" in Spain as a counterpoint to (perceived) Catholic intolerance and enforcement of conformity. It was mostly a myth, of course, but like many others Jefferson did get swept up in the fad... for a while.
Oct
15
comment Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an notes and declaration of Independence
@Coelacanth Some of the Founding Fathers were deists, that is true. But not deists in the sense pf "I believe in one nebulous divine entity" but as a version of Christianity. They had all read their John Locke (religious freedom) but Locke wrote within a Christian context. Even the book that the OP refers to admits that Jefferson felt "personal disdain for the faith". Whatever goodwill he might have felt toward Islam surely evaporated by the time of the First Barbary War. File this Q under "Islam's desperate need for approval from the West".
Oct
14
comment First-hand sources for medieval urban life in central Europe
Have you read this WP page yet? Or just buy the Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle (two volumes), at 399 euros :)
Oct
13
comment Why didn't Zheng He colonize the countries he explored like what the Europeans did to the New World?
The "70 to 90 percent" figure likewise needs a reference.
Oct
13
comment Is this conversation factual?
Counterpunch, Infowars, rense.com, Daily Kos, Russia Today, PressTV: a rogue's gallery of the mendacious, the unhinged, the gullible, the wasters of time. A few of their readers may benefit from a year in re-education camp, the rest just need to be put down.
Oct
13
comment Was Rome obliged to expand its territory whether it wanted to or not?
Do you mean, was Rome dependent on spoils of war and a continuing influx of raw materials, finished goods and foodstuffs from the periphery and did the perimeter constantly have to be widened to keep the scheme going?
Oct
13
comment Was the house of representatives really as rowdy a place as it is portrayed in the 2012 film Lincoln?
@Seth Added details of two incidents in the House.
Oct
12
comment What happened to the overseas wealth of the Holocaust Jews?
You could start off by reading Wikipedia's articles on the Claims Conference and about the Swiss banks and money of Jewish victims of Nazi persecution. Then, using the sources cited in those articles and your favorite search engine, dig deeper. I am sure there are some scholarly works out there already that discuss your questions.
Oct
11
comment Was the house of representatives really as rowdy a place as it is portrayed in the 2012 film Lincoln?
(The U.S. Senate is not the House of Representatives, but as it is the "senior" of the two legislative bodies, with generally older and more experienced lawmakers, it is not a stretch to assume that the HoR was the rowdier place, even if attempted murder did not take place in it.)
Oct
11
comment Why was Jesus crucified (historically?)
Piracy, huh. I think you have a different notion of what English words mean, so I won't continue this discussion.
Oct
11
comment Why was Jesus crucified (historically?)
Anything and everything was liable to be viewed by the Romans as "representing a direct challenge to their rule". Depending on who was Rome's man on the spot and how insecure, despotic or bloodthirsty he felt, he might have someone killed just for looking at him funny. To the Romans, Jesus of Nazareth was no one special, just another troublemaker to be dispatched in a non-unique way, like countless before and after him. On another day, that man might have been let off with a few lashes and history would have turned out differently.
Oct
11
comment Why was Jesus crucified (historically?)
Again, you are wrong to state that the Romans reserved crucifixion to some special class or classes of "culprit". To give but one example -- but there are others -- from Flavius Josephus' The Judean War: "This Felix [procurator over parts of Judea] took Eleazar the arch-robber, and many that were with him, alive, when they had ravaged the country for twenty years together, and sent them to Rome; but as to the number of the robbers whom he caused to be crucified, and of those who were caught among them, and whom he brought to punishment, they were a multitude not to be enumerated."
Oct
11
comment Why was Jesus crucified (historically?)
Your answer makes the same mistake as the question, which is to assume that a Roman crucifixion was anything special. The Romans crucified absconded slaves, common criminals, and sometimes any old soul they could get a hold of in a mass roundup to make an example of them and terrorize the public. Life was cheap in that age.
Oct
11
comment Why was Jesus crucified (historically?)
-1, your answer references Wikipedia but neglects to state that paragraph is marked [citation needed]. It is also at odds with the rest of the WP article, which states: "Notorious mass crucifixions followed the Third Servile War in 73–71 BC (the slave rebellion under Spartacus), other Roman civil wars in the 2nd and 1st centuries BC, and the Destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD. To frighten other slaves from revolting, Crassus crucified 6,000 of Spartacus' men along the Appian Way [...]" and "Roman soldiers would amuse themselves by crucifying criminals in different position [...]"
Oct
9
comment Why was Jesus crucified (historically?)
I am seeing zero upvotes and five downvotes on this question. What explains this massive downvoting?
Oct
9
comment Why was Jesus crucified (historically?)
@LennartRegebro Out of sheer laziness -- I should be able to look this up -- do you happen to know when was the last recorded instance of someone being stoned to death -- or another form of capital punishment -- in a Jewish community anywhere?