5,430 reputation
42165
bio website drennon.com
location San Antonio, TX
age 54
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 3 hours ago

Steven R. Drennon was born in Lawton, OK, where he first started writing at the age of 15. He published an epic fantasy novel titled "Rise of the Raven" in the spring of 2011, and another fantasy novel titled "Three for Avadar" was released in the summer of 2011. Since then, Steven has published a total of 37 other titles under different pen names, and he is currently working on a new historical fiction series that will be published under his own name.


Mar
5
comment What incentives are in place for American soldiers to go fight in Iraq?
@Rodrigo, as a former Marine, I can assure you they are definitely NOT "soft"! The Marines are the most difficult branch of the US military. They are almost always the first to engage in combat, and they almost always serve the longest periods of time closest to the front lines. While Army infantry is often engaged in combat as well, on average they are not exposed to as much actual combat as a Marine.
Feb
27
comment Founding Fathers and the American Civil War
I edited this post to make sure it fell more in line with our question/answer guidelines. The previous version was more likely to solicit discussion or opinion.
Feb
27
comment Was the idea behind what would become the Holocaust planned by German elites in that time?
I am going to close this question because it doesn't really fit into our format. We need to have questions that can be factually answered, rather than implied or suggested through opinion. This question is the type that would generate discussion rather than answers. If you would like to reword it in the form of an answerable question, we can reopen it for you.
Feb
21
comment What is the significance of “Flappers” in American history?
Wikipedia has a pretty thorough breakdown of the evolution and origins of flappers, so I would recommend checking it out. As far as whether or not they were important or why, both questions invite opinion, which is not what we strive for at SE. The question needs to have a clear and concise answer, and I don't believe this one does. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flapper
Jan
26
comment Since the inception of the United States, has the term “America” ever referred to something more than simply “the United States”?
I see what you are saying. I can't think of any instance where "America" would be used to include any territories. I believe it has always referred to the continental portion of the US. For example, I can't envision any situation where the US Virgin Islands or Puerto Rico would either one be referred to as "America" or even as part of "America".
Jan
26
comment What aternative locations were considered for the United Nations?
I don't know that there were any specific arguments. The US appears to have simnply been the first country to offer a permanent home.
Jan
16
comment Are there arguments to think Hitler was a racist?
Sorry, but this question really doesn't fit the proper format for SE. We prefer to have questions that have a clear and distinct answer, rather than one that requires opinion or speculation. You might have better luck with this at the Skeptics.SE site. If you would like to try rewording the question, we can consider opening it back up.
Jan
13
comment How to research controversial history?
You have a point. Anyone writing their observations is going to allow their own opinions to influence what they write. However, some organizations, such as the UN, will at least attempt to reduce the bias. I read a very interesting UN report on the Bosnian war that was very critical of both sides. However, reading a summary from either side independently shows a completely biased view.
Jan
9
comment Hebrew as the Language of America
I would recommend that you ask this question at the Skeptics SE site. I believe it would be better received there.
Jan
4
comment What is modern criticism of Nazism?
After further consideration, I have decided to close this question. If you would like to reword it so that it asks a question that can be definitively answered without relying solely on opinion, then I will be happy to undelete. One option might be to ask about the historical significance of the Nazi movement. Questions regarding morality or ethics are not really appropriate for this site.
Dec
18
comment How did the US/South Vietnam lose the Vietnam war?
There were a number of factors involved there. The inability of the US to maintain a successful military campaign as well as the efforts of the US to control the military initiatives. I believe a lot of South Vietnamese lost faith in their government because they felt that the governement had become puppets that were controlled by the US as a result.
Dec
13
comment Credible historic description of how the daily life was for the middle-class during the financial crisis of 1929
This question was closed because it does not fit within the guidelines for a SE site. The question cannot be answered with facts or references. It can only be answered by opinion or speculation, and that causes it to fall outside the realm of acceptability.
Nov
18
comment What Are the Dynamics of A “Forced March?”
A forced march isn't necessarily a "last" resort, but it is certainly an "extreme" resort!
Oct
31
comment What really happened to the Maya civilization?
The Mayan collapse identified here happened hundreds of years before the Aztecs came into prominence. The Mayans never completely disappeared, but they definitely were found in much smaller numbers, with most migrating to the Yucatan peninsula. The Aztecs were wiped out largely by disease brought over by Spanish Conquistadors.
Oct
28
comment Why did the Monitor and Merrimac (aka Virginia) have such radically different designs?
My mistake. I was looking at a drawing that provided a side view when I said that it had one gun. It actually had two guns, but they were side by side, facing the same direction, not opposite one another.
Oct
27
comment Why did the Monitor and Merrimac (aka Virginia) have such radically different designs?
According to the link above, "Though the former U.S. frigate had been partially burned and sunk by the U.S. Navy, her lower hull and power plant had been salvaged by the Confederates."
Oct
27
comment Why did the southern states secede from the U.S.?
@Doug, I absolutely agree with your last point. I have edited my answer to make certain that slavery is identified as a major contributing factor. I still do not feel that it was the only factor or even the biggest, but it would certainly be unreasonable to include it as a significant factor.
Oct
27
comment Why did the southern states secede from the U.S.?
Actually, it was not about taxation, but tariffs on goods that were being exported. I don't recall seeing anywhere that taxation was a major issue. I understand the desire to blame it all on slavery, and I do not deny that it was a contributing factor. I am simply stating that it was not THE reason that the states seceded. THE reason, factually, was unfair application of tariffs and the South's desire to have a state's rights be considered to be at least equal to that of the Federal government. You guys can argue your emotions, I'm simply stating the facts.
Oct
27
comment Why did the southern states secede from the U.S.?
Follow the FACTS Doug! At the time that the Southern states seceded, there was NO threat to the end of slavery. The Supreme Court sided with the Southern slave owners! There was" a possible threat to the expansion of slavery into new states, but that is not the primary reason for why they seceded.
Oct
27
comment Why did the southern states secede from the U.S.?
I think you over-estimate the relevance of slavery in causing the states to secede. As I pointed out, the Southern states had the Supreme Court on their side, which is why abolitionists like John Brown were captured by Federal troops and prosecuted. Slavery never even became an issue tied to the war until after Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address. Part of the reason it was written that way was in the hopes of enciting slave uprisings to help the North win the war.