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bio website abweb.us
location Boise, ID
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visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Aug 28 at 3:11

A globetrotting PHP/Drupal web developer with iOS/Objective-C and other interests.


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awarded  Good Question
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Good Question
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awarded  Critic
Jan
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comment Was the secession of the Confederate states illegal?
This seems to me to provide just cause for the use of force in response to the secession, but not necessarily affect the legality of the secession itself.
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comment Did World War II-era bombs actually whistle?
Wow, a first-hand account! Thanks for sharing your experience. :D
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Popular Question
Jan
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comment Was the secession of the Confederate states illegal?
Of course, that just begs the question if a state (or presumably some other entity) can unilaterally withdraw from the US in the perspective of the US's federal government. This has been discussed elsewhere in this post, and it doesn't seem to be the case with current laws - see my accepted answer.
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Nice Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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accepted Did World War II-era bombs actually whistle?
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comment Did World War II-era bombs actually whistle?
Warn the people below, you mean? I don't know; to damage infrastructure while reducing civilian casualties, maybe? That's part of the question, really…
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asked Did World War II-era bombs actually whistle?
May
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awarded  Teacher
May
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comment How would you accurately use older British currencies when writing a story?
This sounds about right for the nation that brought us the imperial system.
May
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answered Why do minor political parties in the US receive so few votes?
May
20
comment Was the secession of the Confederate states illegal?
As the judicial branch cannot create laws, but only interpret them, then it would seem to me that Mr Thompson is correct here; what the court ruling was, in effect, was a decision that the act that occurred in 1861 was contrary to laws that existed at that time, and that any secession which happened before or after that was also contrary to the same law. Is this not a correct understanding of how the judicial system in the US works?