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Jan
2
comment Was the Italian campaign a strategic mistake?
Here's another one - all of the UK colonies in total, SA, Canada, Australia/New Zealand, Singapore, India, etc, were ~240bln in GDP, not all of which could be mobilized: www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/staff/academic/harrison/…
Jan
2
comment Was the Italian campaign a strategic mistake?
Here ya go: onwar.com/articles/0302.htm "During the battle of France, in 1940, Italy joined the war on the side of Germany/Austria. In terms of 1939 GDP, the Allies to Axis ratio now stood at 0.86 because of the addition of Italian GDP to the Axis."
Jan
2
answered Was the Italian campaign a strategic mistake?
Jan
2
comment Did Ancient Egyptians in the 2nd millennium BC practice Astrology?
Ummm - some of the oldest documents we have from Egypt dealt with mathematics, astronomy and engineering. Neugbauer was disappointed with their practical nature, the "pure" pursuit of knowledge, in his mind, beginning with the Babylonians - it doesn't do a good job of answering the question. I'll work on another answer on the origins of Egyptian astrology and its integration with hellenistic astrology during the Ptolemaic period.
Dec
31
comment Ancient Civilization in non-Egyption Africa?
Wow, people on this site can be deliberately obtuse. The question is asking about ancient civilizations in sub-saharan Africa, and it's an interesting one. Lots of medieval civilizations are well known, but less is known about earlier ones. Also, millions of results is almost worse than none at all - where do you begin? How do you begin? Study is more than plugging a search term into google. Another vote to re-open.
Dec
18
comment How did people acquire things in the pre-Roman Celtic world?
Ring money was used for expensive purchases, like chariots, where it would be impractical to amass enough barterables, and it was unlikely a chariot seller could use or redistribute them if you could. You wouldn't use it to buy a dozen eggs, but it was the backbone of larger scale economic activity and trade.
Nov
15
comment What is the history of Research and Development laboratories?
The origins and progression of the modern applied science laboratory (R&D is essentially applied science) is a very interesting topic, and surprisingly difficult to track down.
Nov
8
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
31
answered Did Native Americans ever fight the indigenous people living in Mexico before Europeans arrived?
Oct
30
reviewed Approve Languages spoken by Josephus?
Oct
29
revised Origins of Baptist colonists
deleted 5 characters in body
Oct
29
revised Origins of Baptist colonists
deleted 1 characters in body
Oct
29
answered Origins of Baptist colonists
Oct
15
comment Which sources should I believe regarding CV-8 Hornet?
@polarbearonthewhitesnow - Battlefield 360 is pretty terrible. Try John Ford's "Battle of Midway" - it's been remastered recently.
Oct
15
comment Which sources should I believe regarding CV-8 Hornet?
@polarbearonthewhitesnow - Probably because they slapped together a documentary on the cheap, and couldn't afford fact checkers to correct rudimentary mistakes. Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.
Oct
15
answered Which sources should I believe regarding CV-8 Hornet?
Oct
14
comment Why did religion mixed with politics hold back progress of Europeans but not the Turks?
@PieterGeerkens I'm not certain "accumulated body of knowledge" and "rate of accumulation of knowledge" are academically accepted terms - if they are, could you cite their definition and usage, and provide a link or cite to hard metrics for the middle ages for both cultures?
Oct
10
comment Why did Empress Elizabeth and Catherine the Great of Russia have such different policies toward Frederick the Great?
There's also the little matter of Frederick the Great being Frederick the Great - Master statesman and general of the first order. After the Austrians caved, it was far more profitable to be his ally than his enemy.
Oct
4
comment Why didn't Japanese infantrymen and samurai use shields?
@Pieter Geerkens - Japanese battle was based around single combat - a samurai picking an opponent and going after them. Phalanx, maniple and hoplite warfare depended on massed infantry in close formation, where a shield is right handy. Also, note that Musashi was a duelist and not a particularly accomplished soldier: two-handed technique was not practical in combat. Katanas were not practical in combat - pole-arms were far more common and effective primary weapons on the battlefield in medieval Japanese warfare.