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May
20
comment What was Finland's role in the siege of Leningrad?
Interesting to note that during the Lapland War, the Fins did almost as well against the Germans as they did the Russians in the Winter War, inflicting 2:1 losses and suffering minimal civilian casualties, despite the Nazi "scorched earth" strategy.
May
20
comment Did the Roman Empire extend as far north as the Romans could grow wine?
@Drux - Tanais was a hellenic emporium colony that was a client city-state of the Bosporan Kingdom, which was a client kingdom of the Romans (and an outright Roman province for a time under Nero.) It's located in the delta of the Don River, and has been a part of the Russian Empire since 1771.
May
18
comment Who is the earliest recorded person?
Yes, similar issues with the older Egyptian names, too - Ka and Iry-Hor aren't definitely names rater than titles. It'd be awesome if the first known name in history was the guy who brewed the beer.
Apr
7
comment Is there a correlation between the colonial power and the stability/success of the post colonial state?
@FelixGoldberg - King Leopold, not the Belgian state used mercenaries rather than the Belgian military, and the goal was resource extraction, not political control. What political control there was in place was top-down ordered from Belgium, in contrast of the British and French policy of indirect rule, using the locals to administer to the indigenous population of the colonized territory.
Apr
7
comment How would a 16-17th Century European Rapier have been made?
I think the locus of the question is: what construction techniques were used to make rapiers? This is perfectly acceptable, a very active and interesting part of historical research - I believe the confusion is stemming from the included background on why the asker is interested in the question. It can be improved with some formatting and editing so the lede isn't buried.
Apr
7
comment What can be considered to be the single most important reason for the decline of muslim Golden Age?
@BrotherJack - But the question wasn't about the caliphate, but about the period of Islamic cultural and scientific achievement. The locus of Islamic learning and culture had shifted east along with its power centers. The Khwarezmian Empire in particular - Samarkand and Bukhara were on a meteoric rise even as Baghdad was on the wane. The Mongols put an abrupt halt to all Eastern Islamic culture, where in the West, the Reconquista and the corrupt and militarized regimes replacing the Famamids in the wake of the Crusades snuffed out the lights in Andalus and the Maghreb.
Apr
1
comment Why aren't there any Chinese colonies?
@jamesqf - The Norman invasion can be considered part of the Nordic Conquests, and is a part of medieval Europe - and you will note Napoleon sure couldn't hang onto what he conquered. Since the beginning of the modern era, even relatively small European states like Prussia, Switzerland and the Netherlands were insanely dangerous for larger powers to tangle with.
Feb
11
comment Who first in human history has promoted equality rights of all people?
@user438 - History is generally written by those who were able to speak with witnesses or read other written accounts of the event. Once you write down oral history passed on from a time long distant, you have literature, and not history. Important in its own right, but not relevant here.
Nov
21
comment Strange Symbol Painted on Basement Floor
It's similar to a number of alchemical symbols - which one it's meant to be will indicate who left it, as different secret societies and spiritualist movements laid claim to different alchemical elements as part of their rite. A photo of the symbol would clarify things.
Nov
14
comment Were cavalry used in first World War?
@MarkC.Wallace - the Battle of High Wood Hill was part of the Battle of the Somme. More particularly, the Battle of Bazentin Ridge, where dragoons (mounted rifles) and honest-to-gosh lancers defeated and held temporarily German machine-gun and artillery positions after being softened up by artillery and infantry. It is a very interesting answer and needs more citation.
Nov
14
comment Who should be the king/queen of England?
This is the correct answer - the rituals and rules of succession are largely window dressing in the service of political maneuver, up to and including military conquest. The rightful monarch is whoever has the political backing to have their legitimacy accepted.
Oct
17
comment What are some major military successes achieved by the former Soviet Union against the Western World?
@JoeHobbit - The Americans consider the Berlin Airlift a victory for their side, tho: American logistics vs. Soviet ground forces. In retrospect, both sides probably thought they "made a point" - the Cold War was weird like that.
Oct
1
comment Why did Austronesian/Polynesian people not colonize Australia?
@Drux - During the Ice Age, lots of land routes to places existed that are no more (see "Sahul" - the continent as it was during the Pleistocene)
Sep
19
comment What prevented the Mongolian Empire from expanding into Europe?
@TomAu - Ummm - this comment is also ahistorical. Dan Carlin's "Hard Core History" podcast series on the Mongol conquest is a great introduction to the topic, and offers a number of points of departure for further inquiry. It may be a good tool to refine your answer.
Sep
17
comment What prevented the Mongolian Empire from expanding into Europe?
This answer is ahistorical. Ogegai, not Genghis, commanded Subutai to conquer west to the Atlantic, and it was Ogedai's death that caused their recall. Further, it wasn't until the death of Möngke that the Mongol Empire became disunited.
Aug
11
comment Was the Minoan civilization warlike?
@Oldcat - Here's the deal tho: there is no evidence these weapons were used in extensive wars of aggression in either the historical or archaeological record. As a counter-example, we have both from their contemporaneous neighbors in the Mediterranean, the Egyptians and the Hittites, who were aggressive and expansionist and would be major sparring partners if the Minoans were actually war-like, and not simply pork-barrelling or potlaching with defense spending projects.
Aug
11
comment Was the Minoan civilization warlike?
@Oldcat - The argument isn't that the Minoans were pacifists, the argument is that they were not an expansionist militarized society. For all of their arms and fortifications, the evidence is that they went to war rarely and in campaigns of very limited scope (trade wars and grudges between nobles rather than seeking conquest or hegemony).
Jun
30
comment Why bother attacking castles at all? Why not go around?
Note - there are differences in how fortresses are used strategically. In Europe in the late middle ages, there were a lot of castles. Bypass one to invest a fortified town, as that's where the loot was, and the army inside the castle would come out and attack you from the rear. Chase them back inside, and the army in another nearby castle you had bypassed would come out and attack you from the rear. This is how the Hungarians defeated the Golden Horde.
Jun
25
comment Classical battle sizes vs medieval battle sizes
Depends on where in the Middle Ages - the Mongols assembled massive armies, and fought equally massive armies in Eastern and Central Asia. Did you mean only in Europe?
May
29
comment Is Taiwan always a part of People's Republic of China?
@jwenting - It's safe to assume Taiwan has nuclear weapons as well; of the three pariah nations of the '60s and '70s, South Africa, Israel and Taiwan, they were the only one with the technical and economic ability to run a nuclear program who didn't officially announce it.