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Mar
28
revised Why was the British University Grants Committee abolished in 1988?
Correct confusion between student grants and university block grants
Mar
23
answered Why was the British University Grants Committee abolished in 1988?
Mar
21
awarded  Revival
Mar
21
awarded  Yearling
Mar
21
answered In England, how many Jews died during the persecutions of the crusades during 1190-1200?
Mar
13
revised Is Lady Arabella Stuart wearing a Jewish symbol?
Added larger version of portrait
Mar
13
answered Is Lady Arabella Stuart wearing a Jewish symbol?
Feb
26
comment First Royalty in Scotland?
The Anglo Saxon Chronicle is a good source (by the standards of the time) for England in the period roughly 800-1100. That's because it was being written in the years 800-1100. 'Legend' is a reasonable description of accounts which are written down (say) in 800-1100 which refer to events in the year 500AD, or 1AD of 1000BC and have no earlier provenence. You in any case don't cite any sources to support your account, so that's rather moot.
Feb
25
comment First Royalty in Scotland?
This answer implies a level of historicity to events before about 500 AD that simply does not exist. Medieval Scottish royal origin myths claimed descent from the kings of Dal Riata around 500AD, but even the existence of the earlier kings of Dal Riata is dubious. Anything before then is in the realm of legend at best.
May
22
awarded  Custodian
May
22
reviewed Approve How would you accurately use older British currencies when writing a story?
Dec
18
comment How did the Scottish lowlands get their Gaelic name?
A quick Google does suggest the 'Gaul' etymology is widely accepted through a variety of Gaelic dictionaries, but it's not actually the determining point here. ceantar.org/Dicts/MB2/mb20.html
Dec
18
comment How did the Scottish lowlands get their Gaelic name?
... used in the lowlands of Scotland, and that would make no sense to the Irish-speakers who used the same word to describe the English in a completely different part of the world.
Dec
18
comment How did the Scottish lowlands get their Gaelic name?
No it's not suggesting Gaelic is derived from Latin, however Gaelic, like most languages that came into contact with the Romans and the Romance languages that arose from it, and the broader world in which Latin was a lingua franca, does have a lot of Latin loan words, or words of Latin origin. Be all of that as it may, a better dictionary isn't really the issue here. 'Galldachd' as a word for lowlanders/the English/foreigners in different parts of the "Celtic" world exists in Old Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx ... therefore clearly it does not arise from a hypothetical Pictish placename ...
Dec
17
comment How did the Scottish lowlands get their Gaelic name?
I do admit here that I'm being vague with the phrase "In the years when these terms developed" - because I don't exactly know when that was, but I am presuming somewhere around the 1000-1100 mark. Someone with access to a better dictionary than me could fill in the gap.
Dec
17
awarded  Editor
Dec
17
revised How did the Scottish lowlands get their Gaelic name?
added 4 characters in body
Dec
17
comment How did the Scottish lowlands get their Gaelic name?
It's not a Pictish word. The Etymology of Galldachd is via Old Irish 'gall' which derives from Latin 'gallus'.
Dec
17
answered How did the Scottish lowlands get their Gaelic name?
May
19
awarded  Yearling