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The earliest reference I can find comes from a 1937 commentary on Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar", although there are many later references that this handshake was taught to the actors by Lawrence Alma-Tadema in a 1898 staging of the play. It seems to have been often used in this play since, and I could find an example from a 2005 staging.

Almost all references to it is from 2010 and later, which probably is because "cool" teenagers seldom go to watch Shakespeare in a theatre. So this handshake didn't become a "thing" until it popped up in TV and Movies. It seems it is the TV-series "Spartacus" we have to blame/thank for this.

However, there are no Roman era depictions of this handshake that I can find, and there are plenty of depictions of ordinary handshakes from the Roman era, so we have to conclude that it's attribution as a roman handshake is a later invention. That probably goes for the handshake itself as well, although that's less certain. 

It's probably an invention frominvented in the theatre to make the handshake look dramatic, and the prime suspect is Alma-Tadema himself, although this is pure conjecture.

The earliest reference I can find comes from a 1937 commentary on Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar", although there are many later references that this handshake was taught to the actors by Lawrence Alma-Tadema in a 1898 staging of the play. It seems to have been often used in this play since, and I could find an example from a 2005 staging.

Almost all references to it is from 2010 and later, which probably is because "cool" teenagers seldom go to watch Shakespeare in a theatre. So this handshake didn't become a "thing" until it popped up in TV and Movies. It seems it is the TV-series "Spartacus" we have to blame/thank for this.

However, there are no Roman era depictions of this handshake that I can find, and there are plenty of depictions of ordinary handshakes from the Roman era, so we have to conclude that it's a later invention. It's probably an invention from the theatre to make the handshake look dramatic, and the prime suspect is Alma-Tadema himself.

The earliest reference I can find comes from a 1937 commentary on Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar", although there are many later references that this handshake was taught to the actors by Lawrence Alma-Tadema in a 1898 staging of the play. It seems to have been often used in this play since, and I could find an example from a 2005 staging.

Almost all references to it is from 2010 and later, which probably is because "cool" teenagers seldom go to watch Shakespeare in a theatre. So this handshake didn't become a "thing" until it popped up in TV and Movies. It seems it is the TV-series "Spartacus" we have to blame/thank for this.

However, there are no Roman era depictions of this handshake that I can find, and there are plenty of depictions of ordinary handshakes from the Roman era, so we have to conclude that it's attribution as a roman handshake is a later invention. That probably goes for the handshake itself as well, although that's less certain. 

It's probably invented in the theatre to make the handshake look dramatic, and the prime suspect is Alma-Tadema himself, although this is pure conjecture.

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source | link

The earliest reference I can find comes from a 1937 commentary on Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar", although there are many later references that this handshake was taught to the actors by Lawrence Alma-Tadema in a 1898 staging of the play. It seems to have been often used in this play since, and I could find an example from a 2005 staging.

Almost all references to it is from 2010 and later, which probably is because "cool" teenagers seldom go to watch Shakespeare in a theatre. So this handshake didn't become a "thing" until it popped up in TV and Movies. It seems it is the TV-series "Spartacus" we have to blame/thank for this.

However, there are no Roman era depictions of this handshake that I can find, and there are plenty of depictions of ordinary handshakes from the Roman era, so we have to conclude that it's a later invention. It's probably an invention from the theatre to make the handshake look dramatic, and the prime suspect is Alma-Tadema himself.