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The Ruthenians were a group of East Slavic people in Kievan Rus that are not what we would call "Russians" today. The term refers mainly to Belarussians and Ukrainians, the two largest groups who had a common "Ruthenian" language.

The two peoples "travelled"were together as part of the same country under Kievan Rus, the Duchy of Lithuania, the Polish-Lithuaninan Commonwealth, Tsarist Russia, and the Soviet Union. But when the latter broke up in 1991, they went their separate ways.

Why was that? At what point did their language, culture, or ethnicity diverge to cause their eventual separation?

The Ruthenians were a group of East Slavic people in Kievan Rus that are not what we would call "Russians" today. The term refers mainly to Belarussians and Ukrainians who had a common "Ruthenian" language.

The two peoples "travelled" together under Kievan Rus, the Duchy of Lithuania, the Polish-Lithuaninan Commonwealth, Tsarist Russia, and the Soviet Union. But when the latter broke up in 1991, they went their separate ways.

Why was that? At what point did their language, culture, or ethnicity diverge to cause their eventual separation?

The Ruthenians were a group of East Slavic people in Kievan Rus that are not what we would call "Russians" today. The term refers mainly to Belarussians and Ukrainians, the two largest groups who had a common "Ruthenian" language.

The two peoples were together as part of the same country under Kievan Rus, the Duchy of Lithuania, the Polish-Lithuaninan Commonwealth, Tsarist Russia, and the Soviet Union. But when the latter broke up in 1991, they went their separate ways.

Why was that? At what point did their language, culture, or ethnicity diverge to cause their eventual separation?

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Why did the "Ruthenians" break up into "Belarusians" and "Ukrainians?"

The Ruthenians were a group of East Slavic people in Kievan Rus that are not what we would call "Russians" today. The term refers mainly to Belarussians and Ukrainians who had a common "Ruthenian" language.

The two peoples "travelled" together under Kievan Rus, the Duchy of Lithuania, the Polish-Lithuaninan Commonwealth, Tsarist Russia, and the Soviet Union. But when the latter broke up in 1991, they went their separate ways.

Why was that? At what point did their language, culture, or ethnicity diverge to cause their eventual separation?