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The source of this information comes from the personal memoirspersonal memoirs of Yakuza crime boss Kodama. The event never took place, though, so verifying or disproving it is impossible. According to Kodama, he was asked to raise a small army to put down the protests and protect the US president's motorcade and says that he prepared to do this. His proof is that in exchange Ishi signed his memoirs.

The protestors were almost entirely supporters of the Socialist Party. There is some evidence some were also right-wing. While the new treaty would be a great improvement for the status of Japan, it renewed some terms for American military bases and thus any group opposed to American military presence would not support it. The Yakuza would be ultra right-wing, but its political interests would likely be mostly to support the prime minister and thus bolster their power through the political establishment by granting favors. The Yakuza under Kodama were probably used for anti-communist political activities, but the sources for the claims are highly conspiratorial and thus difficult to verify which if any information is true.

The information is included in the book Yakuza: Japan's Criminal UnderworldYakuza: Japan's Criminal Underworld. It is a book by investigative journalist, David E. Kaplan. It is an award-winning best-seller, but not a scholarly resource.

President Eisenhower did visit Okinawavisit Okinawa in 1960. US soldiers were used to secure the president against the large numbers of protestors. There were over 100,000 US soldiers in Japan in 1960, so it is a suspicious claim that it would be necessary or thought appropriate to use Yakuza. The Secret ServiceSecret Service did exist for the purposes of presidential protection in 1960at this time. The president's visit to Tokyo was cancelled after a student protestor was killed at the request of Ishiat the request of Ishi also making it less likely that Ishi planned a heavy handed crack down on protestors using a criminal gang.

The source of this information comes from the personal memoirs of Yakuza crime boss Kodama. The event never took place, though, so verifying or disproving it is impossible. According to Kodama, he was asked to raise a small army to put down the protests and protect the US president's motorcade and says that he prepared to do this.

The protestors were almost entirely supporters of the Socialist Party. There is some evidence some were also right-wing. While the new treaty would be a great improvement for the status of Japan, it renewed some terms for American military bases and thus any group opposed to American military presence would not support it. The Yakuza would be right-wing, but its political interests would likely be mostly to support the prime minister and thus bolster their power through the political establishment by granting favors.

The information is included in the book Yakuza: Japan's Criminal Underworld. It is a book by investigative journalist, David E. Kaplan. It is an award-winning best-seller, but not a scholarly resource.

President Eisenhower did visit Okinawa in 1960. US soldiers were used to secure the president against the large numbers of protestors. There were over 100,000 US soldiers in Japan in 1960, so it is a suspicious claim that it would be necessary or thought appropriate to use Yakuza. The Secret Service did exist for the purposes of presidential protection in 1960. The president's visit to Tokyo was cancelled after a student protestor was killed at the request of Ishi also making it less likely that Ishi planned a heavy handed crack down on protestors using a criminal gang.

The source of this information comes from the personal memoirs of Yakuza crime boss Kodama. The event never took place, though, so verifying or disproving it is impossible. According to Kodama, he was asked to raise a small army to put down the protests and protect the US president's motorcade and says that he prepared to do this. His proof is that in exchange Ishi signed his memoirs.

The protestors were almost entirely supporters of the Socialist Party. There is some evidence some were also right-wing. While the new treaty would be a great improvement for the status of Japan, it renewed some terms for American military bases and thus any group opposed to American military presence would not support it. The Yakuza would be ultra right-wing, but its political interests would likely be mostly to support the prime minister and thus bolster their power through the political establishment by granting favors. The Yakuza under Kodama were probably used for anti-communist political activities, but the sources for the claims are highly conspiratorial and thus difficult to verify which if any information is true.

The information is included in the book Yakuza: Japan's Criminal Underworld. It is a book by investigative journalist, David E. Kaplan. It is an award-winning best-seller, but not a scholarly resource.

President Eisenhower did visit Okinawa in 1960. US soldiers were used to secure the president against the large numbers of protestors. There were over 100,000 US soldiers in Japan in 1960, so it is a suspicious claim that it would be necessary or thought appropriate to use Yakuza. The Secret Service did exist for the purposes of presidential protection at this time. The president's visit to Tokyo was cancelled after a student protestor was killed at the request of Ishi also making it less likely that Ishi planned a heavy handed crack down on protestors using a criminal gang.

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The source of this information comes from the personal memoirs of Yakuza crime boss Kodama. The event never took place, though, so verifying or disproving it is impossible.

  According to Kodama, Japan was expecting large numbers of protests from labor unions and left leaning student groups during a visit from President Eisenhower, and so the US cancelled the visit. Hehe was asked to raise a small army to put down the protests and protect the US presidentpresident's motorcade and says that he didprepared to do this.

The protestors were almost entirely supporters of the Socialist Party. There is some evidence some were also right-wing. While the new treaty would be a great improvement for the status of Japan, it renewed some terms for American military bases and thus any group opposed to American military presence would not support it. The Yakuza would be right-wing, but its political interests would likely be mostly to support the prime minister and thus bolster their power through the political establishment by granting favors.

The information is included in the book Yakuza: Japan's Criminal Underworld. It is a book by investigative journalist, David E. Kaplan. It is an award-winning best-seller, but not a scholarly resource.

President Eisenhower did visit Okinawa in 1960. US soldiers were used to secure the president against the large numbers of protestors. There were over 100,000 US soldiers in Japan in 1960, so it is a suspicious claim that it would be necessary or thought appropriate to use Yakuza. The Secret Service did exist for the purposes of presidential protection in 1960. The president's visit to Tokyo was cancelled after a student protestor was killed at the request of Ishi also making it less likely that Ishi planned a heavy handed crack down on protestors using a criminal gang.

The source of this information comes from the personal memoirs of Yakuza crime boss Kodama. The event never took place.

  According to Kodama, Japan was expecting large numbers of protests from labor unions and left leaning student groups during a visit from President Eisenhower, and so the US cancelled the visit. He was asked to raise a small army to put down the protests and protect the US president and says that he did this.

The information is included in the book Yakuza: Japan's Criminal Underworld. It is a book by investigative journalist, David E. Kaplan. It is an award-winning best-seller, but not a scholarly resource.

The source of this information comes from the personal memoirs of Yakuza crime boss Kodama. The event never took place, though, so verifying or disproving it is impossible. According to Kodama, he was asked to raise a small army to put down the protests and protect the US president's motorcade and says that he prepared to do this.

The protestors were almost entirely supporters of the Socialist Party. There is some evidence some were also right-wing. While the new treaty would be a great improvement for the status of Japan, it renewed some terms for American military bases and thus any group opposed to American military presence would not support it. The Yakuza would be right-wing, but its political interests would likely be mostly to support the prime minister and thus bolster their power through the political establishment by granting favors.

The information is included in the book Yakuza: Japan's Criminal Underworld. It is a book by investigative journalist, David E. Kaplan. It is an award-winning best-seller, but not a scholarly resource.

President Eisenhower did visit Okinawa in 1960. US soldiers were used to secure the president against the large numbers of protestors. There were over 100,000 US soldiers in Japan in 1960, so it is a suspicious claim that it would be necessary or thought appropriate to use Yakuza. The Secret Service did exist for the purposes of presidential protection in 1960. The president's visit to Tokyo was cancelled after a student protestor was killed at the request of Ishi also making it less likely that Ishi planned a heavy handed crack down on protestors using a criminal gang.

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source | link

The source of this information comes from the personal memoirs of Yakuza crime boss Kodama. The event never took place.

According to Kodama, Japan was expecting large numbers of protests from labor unions and left leaning student groups during a visit from President Eisenhower, and so the US cancelled the visit. He was asked to raise a small army to put down the protests and protect the US president and says that he did this.

The information is included in the book Yakuza: Japan's Criminal Underworld. It is a book by investigative journalist, David E. Kaplan. It is an award-winning best-seller, but not a scholarly resource.