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Timber framed buildings cannot go above three floors (about 50 feet) because beyond that they cannot hold up their own weight. Often buildings would be constructed with the first or second floor made of masonry and then wooden floors above. The "average" number of floors in the middle of a city during the Renaissance would be two. Here is a Durer'sDürer's "St. Anthony in the City" (1513) showing the typical Renaissance/Tudor view of a metropolis.

St. Anthony in the City (1513)

Timber framed buildings cannot go above three floors (about 50 feet) because beyond that they cannot hold up their own weight. Often buildings would be constructed with the first or second floor made of masonry and then wooden floors above. The "average" number of floors in the middle of a city during the Renaissance would be two. Here is a Durer's "St. Anthony in the City" (1513) showing the typical Renaissance/Tudor view of a metropolis.

St. Anthony in the City (1513)

Timber framed buildings cannot go above three floors (about 50 feet) because beyond that they cannot hold up their own weight. Often buildings would be constructed with the first or second floor made of masonry and then wooden floors above. The "average" number of floors in the middle of a city during the Renaissance would be two. Here is Dürer's "St. Anthony in the City" (1513) showing the typical Renaissance/Tudor view of a metropolis.

St. Anthony in the City (1513)

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Timber framed buildings cannot go above three floors (about 50 feet) because beyond that they cannot hold up their own weight. Often buildings would be constructed with the first or second floor made of masonry and then wooden floors above. The "average" number of floors in the middle of a city during the Renaissance would be two. Here is a Durer's "St. Anthony in the City" (1513) showing the typical Renaissance/Tudor view of a metropolis.

St. Anthony in the City (1513)