5 Removed historical information (see e.g. ref. <http://meta.stackexchange.com/a/230693> and <http://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/266164>). Removed meta information (this can be put in comments).
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What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that gets publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths during demonstrations at Jackson State College and Kent State University were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as covered by Cat Stevens singing described by the Harry Chapin hit Cat's in the cradle. (Thanks to @Legion600 for persistence in correcting my error regarding Cat Stevens).

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that gets publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths during demonstrations at Jackson State College and Kent State University were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as covered by Cat Stevens singing described by the Harry Chapin hit Cat's in the cradle. (Thanks to @Legion600 for persistence in correcting my error regarding Cat Stevens).

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that gets publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths during demonstrations at Jackson State College and Kent State University were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as described by the Harry Chapin hit Cat's in the cradle.

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

4 Corrected Cat Stevens error *again*. A few more words, and corrections.
source | link

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that getgets publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths during demonstrations at Jackson State College and Kent State University were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as covered by Cat Stevens singingcovered by Cat Stevens singing described by the Harry Chapin hit Cat's in the cradleCat's in the cradle. (Thanks to @Legion600 for persistence in correcting my error regarding Cat Stevens).

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that get publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths at Jackson and Kent were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as covered by Cat Stevens singing the Harry Chapin hit Cat's in the cradle.

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that gets publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths during demonstrations at Jackson State College and Kent State University were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as covered by Cat Stevens singing described by the Harry Chapin hit Cat's in the cradle. (Thanks to @Legion600 for persistence in correcting my error regarding Cat Stevens).

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

3 Correction
source | link

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that get publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths at Jackson and Kent were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as recordedcovered by Cat Stevens singing the Harry Chapin hit Cat Stevens in Cat's in the cradle.

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that get publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths at Jackson and Kent were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as recorded by Cat Stevens in Cat's in the cradle.

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

What was the hippie movement?

Every generation finds a way to define themselves. As young people grow, many seek ways to do two things

  • conform with their peers; find a group to fit into / identify with.

  • be "different"; to rebel in some way.

Not everyone fits the extreme case that get publicized, but they like to think they do.

Not to completely inclusive, before the Hippies, there were Beatniks. Before that the war disrupted society (although people could join up or be objectors). During the depression was the gang culture, and in the US the prohibition experiment. The Roaring Twenties saw the flappers, and the list goes on.

We have less perspective on later generations, but you can see labels such as Gen-X, Gen-Y, etc. Each group likes to think they invented rebellion, along with words like cool.

The drivers of the hippie movement were firstly that they were the first of the Baby Boomers, people born in the immediate post-war period. Their parent were conservative, having just lived through a major war, and were becoming affluent. Music was changing, as it always does, and then the Vietnam war came, with all the usual half-truths and injustices that war brings. Many of the generation were at College or University, where the hot-house atmosphere pushed the development of the movement along rapidly. Television helped publicize major events such as anti-war demonstrations (there's no such thing as bad publicity), and the over-reactions of police and National Guards.

The deaths at Jackson and Kent were the reality shock that were the start of the end of the movement. Janis Joplin's heroin overdose death later the same year continued the reality treatment.

Why did it decline?

Mostly, these movements die out as the bulk of the group grows to maturity and become parents. Often, people will try to continue life as it was before, but the second kid, dealing with their own teenagers and mortgages, and other life pressures gradually push those behaviours into the background. Eventually, there is an OMG moment where they discover they are just like their parents, as covered by Cat Stevens singing the Harry Chapin hit Cat's in the cradle.

Not everyone leaves though. The seriously committed individuals (rather than those who were just "hangers on") continue to live according their ideals.

2 added 135 characters in body
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