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In 1984, Margaret Thatcher and Deng Xiaoping negotiated the British handover of Hong Kong to China 15 years later. Recently released archival documents suggest that one of Thatcher’s prime concerns was to further British business interests in China.

From a recent news report:

“AroundAround six weeks before her trip, the British embassy in Beijing wrote to the Foreign Office urging that Thatcher should ‘press for greater export and investment opportunities for British industry under the signboard of greater participation in China's modernisation.’

It added: ‘It will be important however to handle this in public in such a way that Hong Kong opinion does not see our moves to develop trade as exploitation of the Hong Kong agreement.’

In a nod to this concern, officials decided that Thatcher should not travel with a party of British businessmen to avoid suggestions ‘that we were now getting our prize for having sold out Hong Kong to the Chinese,’ Peter Ricketts, a senior Foreign Office civil servant, wrote to Thatcher advisor Charles Powell on November 16, 1984.

During the trip, business deals including around the development of a nuclear power station in Guangdong were discussed, the files reveal.

AFP: Britain eyed China trade

In 1984, Margaret Thatcher and Deng Xiaoping negotiated the British handover of Hong Kong to China 15 years later. Recently released archival documents suggest that one of Thatcher’s prime concerns was to further British business interests in China.

From a recent news report:

“Around six weeks before her trip, the British embassy in Beijing wrote to the Foreign Office urging that Thatcher should ‘press for greater export and investment opportunities for British industry under the signboard of greater participation in China's modernisation.’

It added: ‘It will be important however to handle this in public in such a way that Hong Kong opinion does not see our moves to develop trade as exploitation of the Hong Kong agreement.’

In a nod to this concern, officials decided that Thatcher should not travel with a party of British businessmen to avoid suggestions ‘that we were now getting our prize for having sold out Hong Kong to the Chinese,’ Peter Ricketts, a senior Foreign Office civil servant, wrote to Thatcher advisor Charles Powell on November 16, 1984.

During the trip, business deals including around the development of a nuclear power station in Guangdong were discussed, the files reveal.

AFP: Britain eyed China trade

In 1984, Margaret Thatcher and Deng Xiaoping negotiated the British handover of Hong Kong to China 15 years later. Recently released archival documents suggest that one of Thatcher’s prime concerns was to further British business interests in China.

From a recent news report:

Around six weeks before her trip, the British embassy in Beijing wrote to the Foreign Office urging that Thatcher should ‘press for greater export and investment opportunities for British industry under the signboard of greater participation in China's modernisation.’

It added: ‘It will be important however to handle this in public in such a way that Hong Kong opinion does not see our moves to develop trade as exploitation of the Hong Kong agreement.’

In a nod to this concern, officials decided that Thatcher should not travel with a party of British businessmen to avoid suggestions ‘that we were now getting our prize for having sold out Hong Kong to the Chinese,’ Peter Ricketts, a senior Foreign Office civil servant, wrote to Thatcher advisor Charles Powell on November 16, 1984.

During the trip, business deals including around the development of a nuclear power station in Guangdong were discussed, the files reveal.

AFP: Britain eyed China trade

1
source | link

In 1984, Margaret Thatcher and Deng Xiaoping negotiated the British handover of Hong Kong to China 15 years later. Recently released archival documents suggest that one of Thatcher’s prime concerns was to further British business interests in China.

From a recent news report:

“Around six weeks before her trip, the British embassy in Beijing wrote to the Foreign Office urging that Thatcher should ‘press for greater export and investment opportunities for British industry under the signboard of greater participation in China's modernisation.’

It added: ‘It will be important however to handle this in public in such a way that Hong Kong opinion does not see our moves to develop trade as exploitation of the Hong Kong agreement.’

In a nod to this concern, officials decided that Thatcher should not travel with a party of British businessmen to avoid suggestions ‘that we were now getting our prize for having sold out Hong Kong to the Chinese,’ Peter Ricketts, a senior Foreign Office civil servant, wrote to Thatcher advisor Charles Powell on November 16, 1984.

During the trip, business deals including around the development of a nuclear power station in Guangdong were discussed, the files reveal.”

AFP: Britain eyed China trade