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I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, and this is probably a bit of a stretch, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have marked a stop on the underground railroad? I know the construction date of the building was stated as 1900-ish so would be too new, but it mentions the concrete in the back basement as "older" so I speculate maybe this connected to an underground chamber of some earlier building?

Passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act only increased the number of slaves who not only escaped from and through Kentucky, but also continued their journey on to Canada. Several slave narratives document escapes by slaves from other Northern Kentucky communities who passed through the Covington or Newport stations on their way to Canada. -- Kentucky and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Undergroundrailroadsmall2.jpgUnderground Railroad

The so-called "Symbol" looks to me like a map of the Ohio river crossing. Look again at your map and note how you've drawn the river as hooking upward on the right, just as the bottom of the symbol hooks up on the right. Could this symbol really be a crude map showing how to cross the river to an area of safety? At the time, there would have been no bridges, but the vertical line might indicate a path to safety from the ferry drop-off point, across a major road to the next station on the railroad.

Slave Escape

I imagine there are land records indicating who owned this property in the 1840-1860 period, and whether there were buildings on this site; if not that would disprove this theory. Also, I'm not sure whether it was common practice to lay concrete floors in basements in that time period - they may have just been dirt floors typically; if that's true this also would blow a hole in my theory.

I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, and this is probably a bit of a stretch, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have marked a stop on the underground railroad? I know the construction date of the building was stated as 1900-ish so would be too new, but it mentions the concrete in the back basement as "older" so I speculate maybe this connected to an underground chamber of some earlier building?

Passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act only increased the number of slaves who not only escaped from and through Kentucky, but also continued their journey on to Canada. Several slave narratives document escapes by slaves from other Northern Kentucky communities who passed through the Covington or Newport stations on their way to Canada. -- Kentucky and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Undergroundrailroadsmall2.jpg

The so-called "Symbol" looks to me like a map of the Ohio river crossing. Look again at your map and note how you've drawn the river as hooking upward on the right, just as the bottom of the symbol hooks up on the right. Could this symbol really be a crude map showing how to cross the river to an area of safety? At the time, there would have been no bridges, but the vertical line might indicate a path to safety from the ferry drop-off point, across a major road to the next station on the railroad.

Slave Escape

I imagine there are land records indicating who owned this property in the 1840-1860 period, and whether there were buildings on this site; if not that would disprove this theory. Also, I'm not sure whether it was common practice to lay concrete floors in basements in that time period - they may have just been dirt floors typically; if that's true this also would blow a hole in my theory.

I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, and this is probably a bit of a stretch, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have marked a stop on the underground railroad? I know the construction date of the building was stated as 1900-ish so would be too new, but it mentions the concrete in the back basement as "older" so I speculate maybe this connected to an underground chamber of some earlier building?

Passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act only increased the number of slaves who not only escaped from and through Kentucky, but also continued their journey on to Canada. Several slave narratives document escapes by slaves from other Northern Kentucky communities who passed through the Covington or Newport stations on their way to Canada. -- Kentucky and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad

The so-called "Symbol" looks to me like a map of the Ohio river crossing. Look again at your map and note how you've drawn the river as hooking upward on the right, just as the bottom of the symbol hooks up on the right. Could this symbol really be a crude map showing how to cross the river to an area of safety? At the time, there would have been no bridges, but the vertical line might indicate a path to safety from the ferry drop-off point, across a major road to the next station on the railroad.

Slave Escape

I imagine there are land records indicating who owned this property in the 1840-1860 period, and whether there were buildings on this site; if not that would disprove this theory. Also, I'm not sure whether it was common practice to lay concrete floors in basements in that time period - they may have just been dirt floors typically; if that's true this also would blow a hole in my theory.

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I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, and this is probably a bit of a stretch, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have beenmarked a stop on the underground railroad? I know the construction date of the building was stated as 1900-ish so would be too new, but it mentions the concrete in the back basement as "older" so I speculate maybe this connected to an underground chamber of some earlier building?

Passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act only increased the number of slaves who not only escaped from and through Kentucky, but also continued their journey on to Canada. Several slave narratives document escapes by slaves from other Northern Kentucky communities who passed through the Covington or Newport stations on their way to Canada. -- Kentucky and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Undergroundrailroadsmall2.jpg

The so-called "Symbol" looks to me like a map of the Ohio river crossing. Look again at your map and note how you've drawn the river as hooking upward on the right, just as the bottom of the symbol hooks up on the right. Could this symbol really be a crude map showing how to cross the river to an area of safety? At the time, there would have been no bridges, but the vertical line might indicate a path to safety from the ferry drop-off point, across a major road to the next station on the railroad.

Slave Escape

I imagine there are land records indicating who owned this property in the 1840-1860 period, and whether there were buildings on this site; if not that would disprove this theory. Also, I'm not sure whether it was common practice to lay concrete floors in basements in that time period - they may have just been dirt floors typically; if that's true this also would blow a hole in my theory.

I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have been a stop on the underground railroad?

Passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act only increased the number of slaves who not only escaped from and through Kentucky, but also continued their journey on to Canada. Several slave narratives document escapes by slaves from other Northern Kentucky communities who passed through the Covington or Newport stations on their way to Canada. -- Kentucky and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Undergroundrailroadsmall2.jpg

The so-called "Symbol" looks to me like a map of the Ohio river crossing. Look again at your map and note how you've drawn the river as hooking upward on the right, just as the bottom of the symbol hooks up on the right. Could this symbol really be a crude map showing how to cross the river to an area of safety? At the time, there would have been no bridges, but the vertical line might indicate a path to safety from the ferry drop-off point, across a major road to the next station on the railroad.

Slave Escape

I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, and this is probably a bit of a stretch, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have marked a stop on the underground railroad? I know the construction date of the building was stated as 1900-ish so would be too new, but it mentions the concrete in the back basement as "older" so I speculate maybe this connected to an underground chamber of some earlier building?

Passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act only increased the number of slaves who not only escaped from and through Kentucky, but also continued their journey on to Canada. Several slave narratives document escapes by slaves from other Northern Kentucky communities who passed through the Covington or Newport stations on their way to Canada. -- Kentucky and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Undergroundrailroadsmall2.jpg

The so-called "Symbol" looks to me like a map of the Ohio river crossing. Look again at your map and note how you've drawn the river as hooking upward on the right, just as the bottom of the symbol hooks up on the right. Could this symbol really be a crude map showing how to cross the river to an area of safety? At the time, there would have been no bridges, but the vertical line might indicate a path to safety from the ferry drop-off point, across a major road to the next station on the railroad.

Slave Escape

I imagine there are land records indicating who owned this property in the 1840-1860 period, and whether there were buildings on this site; if not that would disprove this theory. Also, I'm not sure whether it was common practice to lay concrete floors in basements in that time period - they may have just been dirt floors typically; if that's true this also would blow a hole in my theory.

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I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have been a stop on the underground railroad?

Passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act only increased the number of slaves who not only escaped from and through Kentucky, but also continued their journey on to Canada. Several slave narratives document escapes by slaves from other Northern Kentucky communities who passed through the Covington or Newport stations on their way to Canada. -- Kentucky and the Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Undergroundrailroadsmall2.jpg

The so-called "Symbol" looks to me like a map of the Ohio river crossing. Look again at your map and note how you've drawn the river as hooking upward on the right, just as the bottom of the symbol hooks up on the right. Could this symbol really be a crude map showing how to cross the river to an area of safety? At the time, there would have been no bridges, but the vertical line might indicate a path to safety from the ferry drop-off point, across a major road to the next station on the railroad.

Slave Escape