2 added photo of horses pulling snow
source | link

@twoshedas answer, currently the accepted one, mentions just one approach but there were others. For example, in Montreal, Canada, large shafts that lead from the street level down to the sewers were used by city workers to push snow off the street and out of sight.

From UnderMontreal

A 19th century snow-dump shaft at the beginning stages of the Cote St. Paul collector. Snow Shaft

In addition, an exhibit from the McCord Museum of Montreal, assembled a collection of snow-removal photographs from that era. Here's one, but be sure to check more out via the link.

This photograph shows a Montreal street (rue Notre-Dame) in winter. The street is full of snow and a crowd of people is busy clearing it. We can see that some people are using shovels and even pickaxes to transfer the snow into sorts of sleds pulled by horses. We can also see that Notre-Dame was also a very busy street since quite a few people are walking along it. The snow is trampled and dirty and piled up to the right.

Horses haul snow away from Montreal streets

@twoshedas answer, currently the accepted one, mentions just one approach but there were others. For example, in Montreal, Canada, large shafts that lead from the street level down to the sewers were used by city workers to push snow off the street and out of sight.

From UnderMontreal

A 19th century snow-dump shaft at the beginning stages of the Cote St. Paul collector. Snow Shaft

In addition, an exhibit from the McCord Museum of Montreal, assembled a collection of snow-removal photographs from that era. Here's one, but be sure to check more out via the link.

This photograph shows a Montreal street (rue Notre-Dame) in winter. The street is full of snow and a crowd of people is busy clearing it. We can see that some people are using shovels and even pickaxes to transfer the snow into sorts of sleds pulled by horses. We can also see that Notre-Dame was also a very busy street since quite a few people are walking along it. The snow is trampled and dirty and piled up to the right.

@twoshedas answer, currently the accepted one, mentions just one approach but there were others. For example, in Montreal, Canada, large shafts that lead from the street level down to the sewers were used by city workers to push snow off the street and out of sight.

From UnderMontreal

A 19th century snow-dump shaft at the beginning stages of the Cote St. Paul collector. Snow Shaft

In addition, an exhibit from the McCord Museum of Montreal, assembled a collection of snow-removal photographs from that era. Here's one, but be sure to check more out via the link.

This photograph shows a Montreal street (rue Notre-Dame) in winter. The street is full of snow and a crowd of people is busy clearing it. We can see that some people are using shovels and even pickaxes to transfer the snow into sorts of sleds pulled by horses. We can also see that Notre-Dame was also a very busy street since quite a few people are walking along it. The snow is trampled and dirty and piled up to the right.

Horses haul snow away from Montreal streets

1
source | link

@twoshedas answer, currently the accepted one, mentions just one approach but there were others. For example, in Montreal, Canada, large shafts that lead from the street level down to the sewers were used by city workers to push snow off the street and out of sight.

From UnderMontreal

A 19th century snow-dump shaft at the beginning stages of the Cote St. Paul collector. Snow Shaft

In addition, an exhibit from the McCord Museum of Montreal, assembled a collection of snow-removal photographs from that era. Here's one, but be sure to check more out via the link.

This photograph shows a Montreal street (rue Notre-Dame) in winter. The street is full of snow and a crowd of people is busy clearing it. We can see that some people are using shovels and even pickaxes to transfer the snow into sorts of sleds pulled by horses. We can also see that Notre-Dame was also a very busy street since quite a few people are walking along it. The snow is trampled and dirty and piled up to the right.