6 clarify attribution.
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@T.E.D says,

"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (Cite: Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is strongly claimed by some linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (Cite: Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is strongly claimed by some linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

@T.E.D says,

"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (Cite: Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is strongly claimed by some linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

5 deleted 5 characters in body
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"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (No cites needed for this paragraph, which is well known, at least with Gimbutas-Mallory modelCite: Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is strongly claimed by some linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (No cites needed for this paragraph, which is well known, at least with Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is strongly claimed by some linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (Cite: Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is strongly claimed by some linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

4 added 195 characters in body
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"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (No cites needed for this paragraph, which is well known, at least with Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is believedstrongly claimed by manysome linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later.

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is believed by many linguists due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

"By and large, we really don't know. The timing of archeological finds with the language distribution when the historical record opens makes a very compelling case for the Celto-Italics being the chief people who introduced farming to Western Europe. So any pre-Celtic inhabitants would have been Mesolithic (hunter-gatherers)."

No. Farming arrived in parts of Western Europe by 5000 BC and was very widespread by 4000 BC. Proto-Celtic speakers left the steppes 3500 BC or later, as part of Gimbutas Wave 2 (e.g. Globular Amphora, Corded Ware/Battle Axe/Single Grave). When Western Europe switched to Celtic is unknown, but was surely later than 3000 BC, possibly much later. (No cites needed for this paragraph, which is well known, at least with Gimbutas-Mallory model.)

BTW, proto-Basque, rather than being a language of mesolithic Europe, probably arrived with some of the farmers. This is strongly claimed by some linguists (Cite "Another Member of Vasco-Caucasian?") due to apparent genetic connections among Basque, Burushaski, and some Caucasian languages, with a probable Neolithic time depth. (A word for 'goat' /zikiro/ is one of several example cognates, obeying regular sound change rules.)

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