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I always found WWII to be boring, so I never formed any strong opinions or historical knowledge about it. After watching a few dozen Hitler Ranting videos, however, I picked up a few documentaries and news articles specifically relating to Hitler's death and what all went on while the Allied forces were trying to figure out what happened. One thing that bothers me is that, while most things seem to be cut and dry, Hitler's teeth are a different story.

According to most sources, when the Soviet army was looking for Hitler's corpse, they ran across a corpse that was charred beyond recognition, and they were only able to gather the teeth to use in making an identification. From there, however, what happens seems to diverge.

From different sources:

  • A History Channel documentary about a 2009 investigation into Russian evidence of Hitler's death didn't mention the teeth at all, although they were allowed access to all Russian evidence regarding Hitler.
  • A NatGeo documentary was allowed access to the same evidence, and had both the teeth as well as a 1944 x-ray of Hitler's teeth that prove they belong to him.
  • A different news source said that the Soviets searched Berlin but weren't able to find any dental records, so they had to find his dentist's assistant, who drew the records from memory.
  • A different news source said they carried the teeth to the dental assistant in a box and showed them to her, and she gave a positive ID.
  • All of the sources that mention the dental assistant also mention that no dental records were found, but the Nat Geo documentary doesn't mention the dental assistant but mentions that they actually had X-Rays from 1944.

So, considering that every historical source I've checked has a slightly different story, I was wondering if there was an authoritative historical answeraccounting of what was used to make the positive ID on how the teeth were identified, and if this is a case of everyone has a different story or a case of everyone is telling a different part of the same story (such as they didn't have the dental records at first and had to go to the assistant to Hitler's dentist, but then they found x-rays or something like that).

I always found WWII to be boring, so I never formed any strong opinions or historical knowledge about it. After watching a few dozen Hitler Ranting videos, however, I picked up a few documentaries and news articles specifically relating to Hitler's death and what all went on while the Allied forces were trying to figure out what happened. One thing that bothers me is that, while most things seem to be cut and dry, Hitler's teeth are a different story.

From different sources:

  • A History Channel documentary about a 2009 investigation into Russian evidence of Hitler's death didn't mention the teeth at all, although they were allowed access to all Russian evidence regarding Hitler.
  • A NatGeo documentary was allowed access to the same evidence, and had both the teeth as well as a 1944 x-ray of Hitler's teeth that prove they belong to him.
  • A different news source said that the Soviets searched Berlin but weren't able to find any dental records, so they had to find his dentist's assistant, who drew the records from memory.
  • A different news source said they carried the teeth to the dental assistant in a box and showed them to her, and she gave a positive ID.
  • All of the sources that mention the dental assistant also mention that no dental records were found, but the Nat Geo documentary doesn't mention the dental assistant but mentions that they actually had X-Rays from 1944.

So, considering that every historical source I've checked has a slightly different story, I was wondering if there was an authoritative historical answer on how the teeth were identified, and if this is a case of everyone has a different story or a case of everyone is telling a different part of the same story (such as they didn't have the dental records at first, but then they found x-rays or something like that).

I always found WWII to be boring, so I never formed any strong opinions or historical knowledge about it. After watching a few dozen Hitler Ranting videos, however, I picked up a few documentaries and news articles specifically relating to Hitler's death and what all went on while the Allied forces were trying to figure out what happened. One thing that bothers me is that, while most things seem to be cut and dry, Hitler's teeth are a different story.

According to most sources, when the Soviet army was looking for Hitler's corpse, they ran across a corpse that was charred beyond recognition, and they were only able to gather the teeth to use in making an identification. From there, however, what happens seems to diverge.

From different sources:

  • A History Channel documentary about a 2009 investigation into Russian evidence of Hitler's death didn't mention the teeth at all, although they were allowed access to all Russian evidence regarding Hitler.
  • A NatGeo documentary was allowed access to the same evidence, and had both the teeth as well as a 1944 x-ray of Hitler's teeth that prove they belong to him.
  • A different news source said that the Soviets searched Berlin but weren't able to find any dental records, so they had to find his dentist's assistant, who drew the records from memory.
  • A different news source said they carried the teeth to the dental assistant in a box and showed them to her, and she gave a positive ID.
  • All of the sources that mention the dental assistant also mention that no dental records were found, but the Nat Geo documentary doesn't mention the dental assistant but mentions that they actually had X-Rays from 1944.

So, considering that every historical source I've checked has a slightly different story, I was wondering if there was an authoritative historical accounting of what was used to make the positive ID on the teeth, and if this is a case of everyone has a different story or a case of everyone is telling a different part of the same story (such as they didn't have the dental records at first and had to go to the assistant to Hitler's dentist, but then found x-rays or something like that).

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Hitler's Dental Records

I always found WWII to be boring, so I never formed any strong opinions or historical knowledge about it. After watching a few dozen Hitler Ranting videos, however, I picked up a few documentaries and news articles specifically relating to Hitler's death and what all went on while the Allied forces were trying to figure out what happened. One thing that bothers me is that, while most things seem to be cut and dry, Hitler's teeth are a different story.

From different sources:

  • A History Channel documentary about a 2009 investigation into Russian evidence of Hitler's death didn't mention the teeth at all, although they were allowed access to all Russian evidence regarding Hitler.
  • A NatGeo documentary was allowed access to the same evidence, and had both the teeth as well as a 1944 x-ray of Hitler's teeth that prove they belong to him.
  • A different news source said that the Soviets searched Berlin but weren't able to find any dental records, so they had to find his dentist's assistant, who drew the records from memory.
  • A different news source said they carried the teeth to the dental assistant in a box and showed them to her, and she gave a positive ID.
  • All of the sources that mention the dental assistant also mention that no dental records were found, but the Nat Geo documentary doesn't mention the dental assistant but mentions that they actually had X-Rays from 1944.

So, considering that every historical source I've checked has a slightly different story, I was wondering if there was an authoritative historical answer on how the teeth were identified, and if this is a case of everyone has a different story or a case of everyone is telling a different part of the same story (such as they didn't have the dental records at first, but then they found x-rays or something like that).