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Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations:

  • 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war ended.
  • 2.8 Million Eastern-European Jews at the start of the 20th Century (and even more in the runup to WWII)
  • 1/4 of a MillionsMillion Scotts-Irish during the colonial period
  • 4 Million Irish at the end of the 19th Century (including about 1 Million in the 1850s)
  • 4 Million Italians at the middle to end of the 19th Century (after the war of Italian Unification).
  • 4 Million Germans during the same period (wars both religious and political)

I think its fair to say in every case most of those people would have preferred to stay at home, but the powers-that-be in their homelands were making it impossible for them.

And those are just the big ones that took a lot of "digestion" to deal with. There have been lots of smaller immigration surges from war-torn places like Khmer-run Cambodia, El Salvador (80's and 2014), Somalia (1990's), etc.

Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations:

  • 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war ended.
  • 2.8 Million Eastern-European Jews at the start of the 20th Century (and even more in the runup to WWII)
  • 1/4 of a Millions Scotts-Irish during the colonial period
  • 4 Million Irish at the end of the 19th Century (including about 1 Million in the 1850s)
  • 4 Million Italians at the middle to end of the 19th Century (after the war of Italian Unification).
  • 4 Million Germans during the same period (wars both religious and political)

I think its fair to say in every case most of those people would have preferred to stay at home, but the powers-that-be in their homelands were making it impossible for them.

And those are just the big ones that took a lot of "digestion" to deal with. There have been lots of smaller immigration surges from war-torn places like Khmer-run Cambodia, El Salvador (80's and 2014), Somalia (1990's), etc.

Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations:

  • 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war ended.
  • 2.8 Million Eastern-European Jews at the start of the 20th Century (and even more in the runup to WWII)
  • 1/4 of a Million Scotts-Irish during the colonial period
  • 4 Million Irish at the end of the 19th Century (including about 1 Million in the 1850s)
  • 4 Million Italians at the middle to end of the 19th Century (after the war of Italian Unification).
  • 4 Million Germans during the same period (wars both religious and political)

I think its fair to say in every case most of those people would have preferred to stay at home, but the powers-that-be in their homelands were making it impossible for them.

And those are just the big ones that took a lot of "digestion" to deal with. There have been lots of smaller immigration surges from war-torn places like Khmer-run Cambodia, El Salvador (80's and 2014), Somalia (1990's), etc.

2 edited body
source | link

Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations:

  • 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war ended.
  • 2.8 Million Eastern-European Jews at the start of the 20th Century (and even more in the runup to WWII)
  • 1/4 of a Millions Scotts-Irish during the colonial period
  • 4 Million Irish at the end of the 19th Century (including about 1 Million in the 1850s)
  • 4 Million Italians at the middle to end of the 19th Century (after the war of Italian Unification).
  • 4 Million Germans during the same period (religious warswars both religious and political)

I think its fair to say in every case most of those people would have preferred to stay at home, but the powers-that-be in their homelands were making it impossible for them.

And those are just the big ones that took a lot of "digestion" to deal with. There have been lots of smaller immigration surges from war-torn places like Khmer-run Cambodia, El Salvador (80's and 2014), Somalia (1990's), etc.

Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations:

  • 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war ended.
  • 2.8 Million Eastern-European Jews at the start of the 20th Century (and even more in the runup to WWII)
  • 1/4 of a Millions Scotts-Irish during the colonial period
  • 4 Million Irish at the end of the 19th Century (including about 1 Million in the 1850s)
  • 4 Million Italians at the end of the 19th Century (after the war of Italian Unification).
  • 4 Million Germans during the same period (religious wars)

I think its fair to say in every case most of those people would have preferred to stay at home, but the powers-that-be in their homelands were making it impossible for them.

And those are just the big ones that took a lot of "digestion" to deal with. There have been lots of smaller immigration surges from war-torn places like Khmer-run Cambodia, El Salvador (80's and 2014), Somalia (1990's), etc.

Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations:

  • 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war ended.
  • 2.8 Million Eastern-European Jews at the start of the 20th Century (and even more in the runup to WWII)
  • 1/4 of a Millions Scotts-Irish during the colonial period
  • 4 Million Irish at the end of the 19th Century (including about 1 Million in the 1850s)
  • 4 Million Italians at the middle to end of the 19th Century (after the war of Italian Unification).
  • 4 Million Germans during the same period (wars both religious and political)

I think its fair to say in every case most of those people would have preferred to stay at home, but the powers-that-be in their homelands were making it impossible for them.

And those are just the big ones that took a lot of "digestion" to deal with. There have been lots of smaller immigration surges from war-torn places like Khmer-run Cambodia, El Salvador (80's and 2014), Somalia (1990's), etc.

1
source | link

Well, the United States aren't exactly tivial to get to from Eurasia, but in its 200 year history has absorbed the following mass migrations:

  • 2 Million Vietnamese "boat people" after the Vietnam war ended.
  • 2.8 Million Eastern-European Jews at the start of the 20th Century (and even more in the runup to WWII)
  • 1/4 of a Millions Scotts-Irish during the colonial period
  • 4 Million Irish at the end of the 19th Century (including about 1 Million in the 1850s)
  • 4 Million Italians at the end of the 19th Century (after the war of Italian Unification).
  • 4 Million Germans during the same period (religious wars)

I think its fair to say in every case most of those people would have preferred to stay at home, but the powers-that-be in their homelands were making it impossible for them.

And those are just the big ones that took a lot of "digestion" to deal with. There have been lots of smaller immigration surges from war-torn places like Khmer-run Cambodia, El Salvador (80's and 2014), Somalia (1990's), etc.