3 improve grammar/translation
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From additional research I have clarified this answer to better reflect the documentation from Spanish Historians who have provided much more detailed commentary and record of the events of the Grenadian War.

Your initial question asks if the Grenadian people believed that the Spanish would be faithful to the terms of the surrender. The Spanish Wikipedia article references Luis María de Lojendio in his historical chronicle Gonzalo de Córdoba (p. 90), and has this to say about the negotiations:

Las últimas negociaciones secretas incluyeron el respeto a la religión islámica de los que decidieran quedarse, la posibilidad de emigrar, una exención fiscal por tres años y un perdón general por los delitos cometidos durante la guerra.

Which I have roughly translated with the assistance of Google Translate to:

The last secret negotiations included respect for the Islamic religion of those choosing to stay, the possibility of emigrating, a tax exemption for three years and a general pardon for the crimes committed during the war.

It is clear that the terms of the surrender wherewere secret and known only to the signing parties. Which had later consequence as the Grenadians found out..

Antoni Simón Tarrés a modern Spanish Historian published La Monarquía de los Reyes Católicos a chronicle(A Chronicle on The monarchy of the Catholic Kings) (page 56). His work is referenced later in the Wikipedia article mentioned above, in which we can glimpse the reaction the Grenadian people had to the terms their leader had handed them over unto.

El 25 de noviembre de 1491 fueron firmadas las Capitulaciones de Granada, que concedieron además un plazo de dos meses para la rendición. No hubo necesidad de agotarlo, porque los rumores difundidos entre el pueblo granadino de lo pactado causaron tumultos, sofocados tanto por los cristianos como por los fieles a Boabdil, que acabó por entregar Granada el 2 de enero de 1492

Which I have roughly translated to with the assistance of Google Translate:

On November 25, 1491 the Treaty of Granada was signed, which also granted a period of two months (for the Grenadians) to surrender. There was no need to exhaust itBefore this period ended, because rumors that spread among the Grenadian people of the agreement caused riots, stifled by both Christians and the faithful to Boabdil loyalists, which eventually gave Granada over on the January 2, 1492

Rioting in this case, is a direct result of the Treaties signing. So it is evident that a group of the Muslim Residents of Grenada had no trust in the Spanish to Maintain the treaty.

From additional research I have clarified this answer to better reflect the documentation from Spanish Historians who have provided much more detailed commentary and record of the events of the Grenadian War.

Your initial question asks if the Grenadian people believed that the Spanish would be faithful to the terms of the surrender. The Spanish Wikipedia article references Luis María de Lojendio in his historical chronicle Gonzalo de Córdoba (p. 90), and has this to say about the negotiations:

Las últimas negociaciones secretas incluyeron el respeto a la religión islámica de los que decidieran quedarse, la posibilidad de emigrar, una exención fiscal por tres años y un perdón general por los delitos cometidos durante la guerra.

Which I have roughly translated with the assistance of Google Translate to:

The last secret negotiations included respect for the Islamic religion of those choosing to stay, the possibility of emigrating, a tax exemption for three years and a general pardon for the crimes committed during the war.

It is clear that the terms of the surrender where secret only to the signing parties. Which had later consequence as the Grenadians found out..

Antoni Simón Tarrés a modern Spanish Historian published La Monarquía de los Reyes Católicos a chronicle on The monarchy of the Catholic Kings (page 56). His work is referenced later in the Wikipedia article mentioned above, in which we can glimpse the reaction the Grenadian people had to the terms their leader had handed them over unto.

El 25 de noviembre de 1491 fueron firmadas las Capitulaciones de Granada, que concedieron además un plazo de dos meses para la rendición. No hubo necesidad de agotarlo, porque los rumores difundidos entre el pueblo granadino de lo pactado causaron tumultos, sofocados tanto por los cristianos como por los fieles a Boabdil, que acabó por entregar Granada el 2 de enero de 1492

Which I have roughly translated to with the assistance of Google Translate:

On November 25, 1491 the Treaty of Granada was signed, which also granted a period of two months (for the Grenadians) to surrender. There was no need to exhaust it, because rumors spread among the Grenadian people of the agreement caused riots, stifled by both Christians and the faithful to Boabdil, which eventually gave Granada over on the January 2, 1492

Rioting in this case, is a direct result of the Treaties signing. So it is evident that a group of the Muslim Residents of Grenada had no trust in the Spanish to Maintain the treaty.

From additional research I have clarified this answer to better reflect the documentation from Spanish Historians who have provided much more detailed commentary and record of the events of the Grenadian War.

Your initial question asks if the Grenadian people believed that the Spanish would be faithful to the terms of the surrender. The Spanish Wikipedia article references Luis María de Lojendio in his historical chronicle Gonzalo de Córdoba (p. 90), and has this to say about the negotiations:

Las últimas negociaciones secretas incluyeron el respeto a la religión islámica de los que decidieran quedarse, la posibilidad de emigrar, una exención fiscal por tres años y un perdón general por los delitos cometidos durante la guerra.

Which I have roughly translated with the assistance of Google Translate to:

The last secret negotiations included respect for the Islamic religion of those choosing to stay, the possibility of emigrating, a tax exemption for three years and a general pardon for the crimes committed during the war.

It is clear that the terms of the surrender were secret and known only to the signing parties. Which had later consequence as the Grenadians found out..

Antoni Simón Tarrés a modern Spanish Historian published La Monarquía de los Reyes Católicos (A Chronicle on The monarchy of the Catholic Kings) (page 56). His work is referenced later in the Wikipedia article mentioned above, in which we can glimpse the reaction the Grenadian people had to the terms their leader had handed them over unto.

El 25 de noviembre de 1491 fueron firmadas las Capitulaciones de Granada, que concedieron además un plazo de dos meses para la rendición. No hubo necesidad de agotarlo, porque los rumores difundidos entre el pueblo granadino de lo pactado causaron tumultos, sofocados tanto por los cristianos como por los fieles a Boabdil, que acabó por entregar Granada el 2 de enero de 1492

Which I have roughly translated to with the assistance of Google Translate:

On November 25, 1491 the Treaty of Granada was signed, which also granted a period of two months (for the Grenadians) to surrender. Before this period ended, rumors that spread among the Grenadian people of the agreement caused riots, stifled by both Christians and Boabdil loyalists, which eventually gave Granada over on the January 2, 1492

Rioting in this case, is a direct result of the Treaties signing. So it is evident that a group of the Muslim Residents of Grenada had no trust in the Spanish to Maintain the treaty.

2 Edited to better answer the OP's question
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It is paramountFrom additional research I have clarified this answer to remember when discussing opinions ofbetter reflect the common folk throughout history that there was a very low literacy rate so records of their opinions can not often be backed up directly anddocumentation from Spanish Historians who have to be reasoned through their actions. A prime exampleprovided much more detailed commentary and record of the Morisco opinion on their subjugation can be evidenced by the Morisco Rebellions through a seriesevents of revolts against their Catholic Overlords. These revolts were sparked by the pressured conversion ofGrenadian War.

Your initial question asks if the MoriscoGrenadian people by their Spanish Rulers. These revolts were then used bybelieved that the Spanish policy makers as justificationwould be faithful to end the Treatyterms of Granadathe surrender. The Spanish Wikipedia article references Luis María de Lojendio in its entiretyhis historical chronicle Gonzalo de Córdoba (p. 90), and enforce conversion or expulsion forhas this to say about the negotiations:

Las últimas negociaciones secretas incluyeron el respeto a la religión islámica de los que decidieran quedarse, la posibilidad de emigrar, una exención fiscal por tres años y un perdón general por los delitos cometidos durante la guerra.

Which I have roughly translated with the Moor peoplesassistance of Andalusia.Google Translate to:

The last secret negotiations included respect for the Islamic religion of those choosing to stay, the possibility of emigrating, a tax exemption for three years and a general pardon for the crimes committed during the war.

DidIt is clear that the Muslims Residentsterms of the annexed Grenadian Kingdom expect the Spanish to keepsurrender where secret only to the treaty? Any statement on this subject matter is unfoundedsigning parties. Which had later consequence as the technology did not exist to aggregate public opinion during this timeGrenadians found out. It could be speculated that the revolutions were a preemptive strike against perceived future violations of the Treaty although this seems unlikely.

In factAntoni Simón Tarrés a far more plausible reason for the revolution was resistance to the pressured conversionmodern Spanish Historian published La Monarquía de los Reyes Católicos a chronicle on The monarchy of which all mention to is omitted from the TreatyCatholic Kings (page 56). As perHis work is referenced later in the TreatyWikipedia article mentioned above, the Spanish were not in violation by pressuringwhich we can glimpse the conversion ofreaction the Muslim population. Rather,Grenadian people had to the Treaty encouraged Muslims convertsterms their leader had handed them over unto.

El 25 de noviembre de 1491 fueron firmadas las Capitulaciones de Granada, que concedieron además un plazo de dos meses para la rendición. No hubo necesidad de agotarlo, porque los rumores difundidos entre el pueblo granadino de lo pactado causaron tumultos, sofocados tanto por los cristianos como por los fieles a Boabdil, que acabó por entregar Granada el 2 de enero de 1492

Which I have roughly translated to stay Catholic, and forwith the processassistance of conversion to be streamlinedGoogle Translate:

  • That the Christians who had embraced Islam should not be compelled to relinquish it and adopt their former creed.
  • That any Muslim wishing to become a Christian should be allowed some days to consider the step he was about to take; after which he is to be questioned by both a Muslim and a Christian judge concerning his intended change, and if, after this examination, he still refused to return to Islam, he should be permitted to follow his own inclination.

On November 25, 1491 the Treaty of Granada was signed, which also granted a period of two months (for the Grenadians) to surrender. There was no need to exhaust it, because rumors spread among the Grenadian people of the agreement caused riots, stifled by both Christians and the faithful to Boabdil, which eventually gave Granada over on the January 2, 1492

Rioting in this case, is a direct result of the Treaties signing. So it is evident that a group of the Muslim Residents of Grenada had no trust in the Spanish to Maintain the treaty.

It is paramount to remember when discussing opinions of the common folk throughout history that there was a very low literacy rate so records of their opinions can not often be backed up directly and have to be reasoned through their actions. A prime example of the Morisco opinion on their subjugation can be evidenced by the Morisco Rebellions through a series of revolts against their Catholic Overlords. These revolts were sparked by the pressured conversion of the Morisco people by their Spanish Rulers. These revolts were then used by Spanish policy makers as justification to end the Treaty of Granada in its entirety and enforce conversion or expulsion for the Moor peoples of Andalusia.

Did the Muslims Residents of the annexed Grenadian Kingdom expect the Spanish to keep to the treaty? Any statement on this subject matter is unfounded as the technology did not exist to aggregate public opinion during this time. It could be speculated that the revolutions were a preemptive strike against perceived future violations of the Treaty although this seems unlikely.

In fact a far more plausible reason for the revolution was resistance to the pressured conversion of which all mention to is omitted from the Treaty. As per the Treaty, the Spanish were not in violation by pressuring the conversion of the Muslim population. Rather, the Treaty encouraged Muslims converts to stay Catholic, and for the process of conversion to be streamlined:

  • That the Christians who had embraced Islam should not be compelled to relinquish it and adopt their former creed.
  • That any Muslim wishing to become a Christian should be allowed some days to consider the step he was about to take; after which he is to be questioned by both a Muslim and a Christian judge concerning his intended change, and if, after this examination, he still refused to return to Islam, he should be permitted to follow his own inclination.

From additional research I have clarified this answer to better reflect the documentation from Spanish Historians who have provided much more detailed commentary and record of the events of the Grenadian War.

Your initial question asks if the Grenadian people believed that the Spanish would be faithful to the terms of the surrender. The Spanish Wikipedia article references Luis María de Lojendio in his historical chronicle Gonzalo de Córdoba (p. 90), and has this to say about the negotiations:

Las últimas negociaciones secretas incluyeron el respeto a la religión islámica de los que decidieran quedarse, la posibilidad de emigrar, una exención fiscal por tres años y un perdón general por los delitos cometidos durante la guerra.

Which I have roughly translated with the assistance of Google Translate to:

The last secret negotiations included respect for the Islamic religion of those choosing to stay, the possibility of emigrating, a tax exemption for three years and a general pardon for the crimes committed during the war.

It is clear that the terms of the surrender where secret only to the signing parties. Which had later consequence as the Grenadians found out..

Antoni Simón Tarrés a modern Spanish Historian published La Monarquía de los Reyes Católicos a chronicle on The monarchy of the Catholic Kings (page 56). His work is referenced later in the Wikipedia article mentioned above, in which we can glimpse the reaction the Grenadian people had to the terms their leader had handed them over unto.

El 25 de noviembre de 1491 fueron firmadas las Capitulaciones de Granada, que concedieron además un plazo de dos meses para la rendición. No hubo necesidad de agotarlo, porque los rumores difundidos entre el pueblo granadino de lo pactado causaron tumultos, sofocados tanto por los cristianos como por los fieles a Boabdil, que acabó por entregar Granada el 2 de enero de 1492

Which I have roughly translated to with the assistance of Google Translate:

On November 25, 1491 the Treaty of Granada was signed, which also granted a period of two months (for the Grenadians) to surrender. There was no need to exhaust it, because rumors spread among the Grenadian people of the agreement caused riots, stifled by both Christians and the faithful to Boabdil, which eventually gave Granada over on the January 2, 1492

Rioting in this case, is a direct result of the Treaties signing. So it is evident that a group of the Muslim Residents of Grenada had no trust in the Spanish to Maintain the treaty.

1
source | link

It is paramount to remember when discussing opinions of the common folk throughout history that there was a very low literacy rate so records of their opinions can not often be backed up directly and have to be reasoned through their actions. A prime example of the Morisco opinion on their subjugation can be evidenced by the Morisco Rebellions through a series of revolts against their Catholic Overlords. These revolts were sparked by the pressured conversion of the Morisco people by their Spanish Rulers. These revolts were then used by Spanish policy makers as justification to end the Treaty of Granada in its entirety and enforce conversion or expulsion for the Moor peoples of Andalusia.

Did the Muslims Residents of the annexed Grenadian Kingdom expect the Spanish to keep to the treaty? Any statement on this subject matter is unfounded as the technology did not exist to aggregate public opinion during this time. It could be speculated that the revolutions were a preemptive strike against perceived future violations of the Treaty although this seems unlikely.

In fact a far more plausible reason for the revolution was resistance to the pressured conversion of which all mention to is omitted from the Treaty. As per the Treaty, the Spanish were not in violation by pressuring the conversion of the Muslim population. Rather, the Treaty encouraged Muslims converts to stay Catholic, and for the process of conversion to be streamlined:

  • That the Christians who had embraced Islam should not be compelled to relinquish it and adopt their former creed.
  • That any Muslim wishing to become a Christian should be allowed some days to consider the step he was about to take; after which he is to be questioned by both a Muslim and a Christian judge concerning his intended change, and if, after this examination, he still refused to return to Islam, he should be permitted to follow his own inclination.