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I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. A similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941 and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.)

My problem is that I am not sure how to define "Russia." I want the 1941 "predecessor" to today's Russia (post war changes probably mean that they are not exactly the same)." My best guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic, assuming it is in fact the best "predecessor."

Put another way, the question is how much of German-occupied territory was "Russia" (however defined) as opposed to the rest of the Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. A similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941 and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.) Put another way, how much of German-occupied territory was "Russia" (however defined) as opposed to the rest of the Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. A similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941 and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.)

My problem is that I am not sure how to define "Russia." I want the 1941 "predecessor" to today's Russia (post war changes probably mean that they are not exactly the same)." My best guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic, assuming it is in fact the best "predecessor."

Put another way, the question is how much of German-occupied territory was "Russia" (however defined) as opposed to the rest of the Soviet Union?

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I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. A similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941 and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.) Is it true that occupied RussiaPut another way, how much of German-occupied territory was "small" compared"Russia" (however defined) as opposed to the rest of the occupied Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. A similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941 and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.) Is it true that occupied Russia was "small" compared to the rest of the occupied Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. A similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941 and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.) Put another way, how much of German-occupied territory was "Russia" (however defined) as opposed to the rest of the Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

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I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. IfA similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941, and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensivecounteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.) Is it true that occupied Russia was "small" compared to the rest of the occupied Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941, and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensive? Is it true that occupied Russia was "small" compared to the rest of the occupied Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

I am well aware that the German invasion of the Soviet Union, as depicted on maps like these, showed large German gains in 1941, and subsequently on the road to Stalingrad in 1942.

My understanding, however, was that these gains were mainly in the Baltic States, Belorussia, and the Ukraine, and that only a little of "Russia" proper (as we might define it today) was occupied by the Germans, except for the seesaw fighting on the road to Moscow from October 1941 to say, March 1942, during which almost 100,000 square miles of the country was captured and liberated. A similar "exception" can be made for land between the Don and Volga Rivers in late 1942 that the Germans occupied for a few months before losing the battle of Stalingrad. If anything, Russia gained troops, civilians, and factories that were withdrawn from the non-Russian part of the Soviet Union in anticipation of German occupation to compensate for lost territory.

How much of "Russia" (of 1941) was occupied by the Germans at 1) its maximum extent in December, 1941 and/or 1942? and 2) after the successful conclusion of the Russian winter counteroffensives? (Please use Germany's March 1943 recapture of Kharkov as the end of the Russian 1943 counteroffensive.) Is it true that occupied Russia was "small" compared to the rest of the occupied Soviet Union?

My guess is that the best proxy for "Russia" is the Russian Federalist Soviet Republic. Is it comparable to today's Russia? Or is there a better definition of Russia (perhaps with the benefit of hindsight) for the purpose of this question?

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