5 added 12 characters in body
source | link

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers (in per cent of global production) for iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

The overall global production for 1937 is given as 98.0 million metric tons.

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers (in per cent of global production) for iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers (in per cent of global production) for iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

The overall global production for 1937 is given as 98.0 million metric tons.

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

4 added 12 characters in body
source | link

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers for million metric tons(in per cent of global production) for iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers for million metric tons of iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers (in per cent of global production) for iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

3 added 946 characters in body
source | link

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers for million metric tons of iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.

The Plan R 4 article lists the following source:

Ziemke, Earl F. (2000) [1960]. "Chapter 2, The German Decision to Invade Norway and Denmark"., Command Decisions, United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 70-7.

Quoting from the source, emphasis mine:

With due allowance for Hitler's tendency to play by ear, it can be said that the German interest in Norwegian neutrality at the beginning of the war was sincere. For Germany the advantages were substantial. Of the approximately six million tons of Swedish magnetite iron ore which Germany imported annually, about half passed through the Norwegian ice-free port of Narvik.

So while the numbers don't really match up (6 vs. 9 millions), the overall claim that Swedish ore was a significant ressource for Germany is legit.


Extending regarding the comment on total numbers:

This site lists 1937 worldwide iron ore production. It doesn't list its sources, but it looks far too detailed and matches with my knowledge of these matters at a glance, so I doubt the numbers are made up.

Copying the numbers for million metric tons of iron ore, sorted:

  • USA, 38.0
  • USSR, 14.3
  • France, 11.7
  • Sweden, 9.3
  • Rest of British Empire, 5.9
  • UK, 4.4
  • Greater Germany (incl. Austria, Czech Protectorate), 4.1
  • Japan (incl. occupied territories), 2.2
  • Rest of French Empire, 1.8
  • Latin America, 1.4
  • Norway, 0.7
  • Italy, 0.5
  • Yugoslavia, 0.3
  • China, 0.2
  • Hungary, 0.1
  • Rumania, 0.1
  • Greece, 0.1

In light of those numbers, I'd say six million tons of annual imports are pretty significant, especially since France is not yet conquered.

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