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Prof Brian A Paclav (King's College, Wilkes-Barre) writes ("Witch Hunts in Europe from 1400 to 1800" ):

The majority of accused and executed were female, yet also old, living alone (whether widowed or spinster), and poor.

Women had lower social standing, were less influential, and therefore could be more easily scapegoated. (Sadly, still have, are, and can be).

Humanity has a long tradition of finding scapegoats for society's ills among those without the power to strike back: the poor, the disadvantaged, those on the fringes without protection. Women (particularly unmarried/widowed), the disabled, the mentally ill, immigrants, even children.

Deborah Hyde, a specialist in the history of supernatural belief and who has studied European and African witch hunts, concluded in an article about Nigeria's witch children.:

paranoia and scapegoating ... are the primary features of a witch hunt, things which come from the social and economic circumstances at large

Prof Brian A Paclav (King's College, Wilkes-Barre) writes:

The majority of accused and executed were female, yet also old, living alone (whether widowed or spinster), and poor.

Women had lower social standing, were less influential, and therefore could be more easily scapegoated. (Sadly, still have, are, and can be).

Humanity has a long tradition of finding scapegoats for society's ills among those without the power to strike back: the poor, the disadvantaged, those on the fringes without protection. Women (particularly unmarried/widowed), the disabled, the mentally ill, immigrants, even children.

Deborah Hyde, a specialist in the history of supernatural belief and who has studied European and African witch hunts, concluded in an article about Nigeria's witch children.:

paranoia and scapegoating ... are the primary features of a witch hunt, things which come from the social and economic circumstances at large

Prof Brian A Paclav (King's College, Wilkes-Barre) writes ("Witch Hunts in Europe from 1400 to 1800" ):

The majority of accused and executed were female, yet also old, living alone (whether widowed or spinster), and poor.

Women had lower social standing, were less influential, and therefore could be more easily scapegoated. (Sadly, still have, are, and can be).

Humanity has a long tradition of finding scapegoats for society's ills among those without the power to strike back: the poor, the disadvantaged, those on the fringes without protection. Women (particularly unmarried/widowed), the disabled, the mentally ill, immigrants, even children.

Deborah Hyde, a specialist in the history of supernatural belief and who has studied European and African witch hunts, concluded in an article about Nigeria's witch children.:

paranoia and scapegoating ... are the primary features of a witch hunt, things which come from the social and economic circumstances at large

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Prof Brian A Paclav (King's College, Wilkes-Barre) writes:

The majority of accused and executed were female, yet also old, living alone (whether widowed or spinster), and poor.

Women had lower social standing, were less influential, and therefore could be more easily scapegoated. (Sadly, still have, are, and can be).

Humanity has a long tradition of finding scapegoats for society's ills among those without the power to strike back: the poor, the disadvantaged, those on the fringes without protection. Women (particularly unmarried/widowed), the disabled, the mentally ill, immigrants, even children.

Deborah Hyde, a specialist in the history of supernatural belief and who has studied European and African witch hunts, concluded in an article about Nigeria's witch children.:

paranoia and scapegoating ... are the primary features of a witch hunt, things which come from the social and economic circumstances at large

Women had lower social standing, were less influential, and therefore could be more easily scapegoated. (Sadly, still have, are, and can be).

Humanity has a long tradition of finding scapegoats for society's ills among those without the power to strike back: the poor, the disadvantaged, those on the fringes without protection. Women (particularly unmarried/widowed), the disabled, the mentally ill, immigrants, even children.

Prof Brian A Paclav (King's College, Wilkes-Barre) writes:

The majority of accused and executed were female, yet also old, living alone (whether widowed or spinster), and poor.

Women had lower social standing, were less influential, and therefore could be more easily scapegoated. (Sadly, still have, are, and can be).

Humanity has a long tradition of finding scapegoats for society's ills among those without the power to strike back: the poor, the disadvantaged, those on the fringes without protection. Women (particularly unmarried/widowed), the disabled, the mentally ill, immigrants, even children.

Deborah Hyde, a specialist in the history of supernatural belief and who has studied European and African witch hunts, concluded in an article about Nigeria's witch children.:

paranoia and scapegoating ... are the primary features of a witch hunt, things which come from the social and economic circumstances at large

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source | link

Women had lower social standing, were less influential, and therefore could be more easily scapegoated. (Sadly, still have, are, and can be).

Humanity has a long tradition of finding scapegoats for society's ills among those without the power to strike back: the poor, the disadvantaged, those on the fringes without protection. Women (particularly unmarried/widowed), the disabled, the mentally ill, immigrants, even children.