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Yes. According to this paper the concept of "ambidexterity" has been a part of Canon law since medieval times.

brief quote:

Sayles notes that there was "a monotonous outcry against the practice whereby the pleader insinuated himself into the confidence of one party and afterwards transferred his services to the other." Christian stated that serjeants "were often accused of being 'ambidexters' and taking fees from both sides."" The Mirror ofJustices, a late thirteenth century attack on judges and the legal system, said that a lawyer should be "suspended if he is attainted of receiving a fee from both sides in one cause.""

I can't answer ifAccording to the inquisition addressed this topicCatholic Encyclopedia,

The judges were to be at least forty years old, of unimpeachable reputation, distinguished for virtue and wisdom, masters of theology, or doctors or licentiates of canon law, and they must follow the usual ecclesiastical rules and regulations. On 17 September, 1480, Their Catholic Majesties appointed, at first for Seville, the two Dominicans Miguel de Morillo and Juan de San Martin as inquisitors, with two of the secular clergy assistants. Catholic Encyclopedia

(note: I've cherrypicked the section on the inquisition in Spain; you'll need to do additional research to verify that the inquisition in Italy is chartered and I don't know iforganized the Inquisition's legal proceedings were carried out under special chapters of canon law, butsame way. The reason I've picked this section is that it explicitly states that the concept of conflcitqualifications for the members include "licentiates of interest orcanon law" ambidexterity was present- meaning that they would be familiar with the sections on ambidexterity. If you can find similar qualifications for the Inquisition in canon lawItaly, you'll be very close to your answer.)

Yes. According to this paper the concept of "ambidexterity" has been a part of Canon law since medieval times.

brief quote:

Sayles notes that there was "a monotonous outcry against the practice whereby the pleader insinuated himself into the confidence of one party and afterwards transferred his services to the other." Christian stated that serjeants "were often accused of being 'ambidexters' and taking fees from both sides."" The Mirror ofJustices, a late thirteenth century attack on judges and the legal system, said that a lawyer should be "suspended if he is attainted of receiving a fee from both sides in one cause.""

I can't answer if the inquisition addressed this topic, and I don't know if the Inquisition's legal proceedings were carried out under special chapters of canon law, but the concept of conflcit of interest or ambidexterity was present in canon law.

Yes. According to this paper the concept of "ambidexterity" has been a part of Canon law since medieval times.

brief quote:

Sayles notes that there was "a monotonous outcry against the practice whereby the pleader insinuated himself into the confidence of one party and afterwards transferred his services to the other." Christian stated that serjeants "were often accused of being 'ambidexters' and taking fees from both sides."" The Mirror ofJustices, a late thirteenth century attack on judges and the legal system, said that a lawyer should be "suspended if he is attainted of receiving a fee from both sides in one cause.""

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia,

The judges were to be at least forty years old, of unimpeachable reputation, distinguished for virtue and wisdom, masters of theology, or doctors or licentiates of canon law, and they must follow the usual ecclesiastical rules and regulations. On 17 September, 1480, Their Catholic Majesties appointed, at first for Seville, the two Dominicans Miguel de Morillo and Juan de San Martin as inquisitors, with two of the secular clergy assistants. Catholic Encyclopedia

(note: I've cherrypicked the section on the inquisition in Spain; you'll need to do additional research to verify that the inquisition in Italy is chartered and organized the same way. The reason I've picked this section is that it explicitly states that the qualifications for the members include "licentiates of canon law" - meaning that they would be familiar with the sections on ambidexterity. If you can find similar qualifications for the Inquisition in Italy, you'll be very close to your answer.)

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Yes. According to this paper the concept of "ambidexterity" has been a part of Canon law since medieval times.

brief quote:

Sayles notes that there was "a monotonous outcry against the practice whereby the pleader insinuated himself into the confidence of one party and afterwards transferred his services to the other." Christian stated that serjeants "were often accused of being 'ambidexters' and taking fees from both sides."" The Mirror ofJustices, a late thirteenth century attack on judges and the legal system, said that a lawyer should be "suspended if he is attainted of receiving a fee from both sides in one cause.""

I can't answer if the inquisition addressed this topic, and I don't know if the Inquisition's legal proceedings were carried out under special chapters of canon law, but the concept of conflcit of interest or ambidexterity was present in canon law.