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Two reasons why not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirluse the longer release arc to get the velocity generated for launch. (Compare a compact throw from second base to first versus a pitcher's full body extension in terms of release time) This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there). It also adds additional motions/movements that can go wrong. The grenade lob is a comparatively simple, compact motion.

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirlinglaunch process, and placing your own comrades at risk. (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade.

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of rifle grenades, which date back in concept to 20th century warfare (WWI and WWII). Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range was needed.

Nowadays, there are whole families of grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade(the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade/grenade launcher (The right tool for the job)

Sources:
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

Two reasons why not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirl to get the velocity generated for launch. This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there).

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirling process, and placing your own comrades at risk. (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade.

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of rifle grenades, which date back in concept to 20th century warfare (WWI and WWII). Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range was needed.

Nowadays, there are whole families of grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade(the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade/grenade launcher (The right tool for the job)

Sources:
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

Two reasons why not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) use the longer release arc to get the velocity generated for launch. (Compare a compact throw from second base to first versus a pitcher's full body extension in terms of release time) This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there). It also adds additional motions/movements that can go wrong. The grenade lob is a comparatively simple, compact motion.

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the launch process, and placing your own comrades at risk. (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade.

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of rifle grenades, which date back in concept to 20th century warfare (WWI and WWII). Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range was needed.

Nowadays, there are whole families of grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade(the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade/grenade launcher (The right tool for the job)

Sources:
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

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Two reasons why not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirl to get the velocity generated for launch. This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there).

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirling process, and placing your own comrades at risk. (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade.

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of rifle grenades, which date back in concept to 20th century warfare (WWI and WWII). Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range was needed.

Nowadays, there are whole families of grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade(the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade/grenade launcher (The right tool for the job)

Sources:
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

Two reasons why not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirl to get the velocity generated for launch. This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there).

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirling process, and placing your own comrades at risk. (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade.

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of rifle grenades, which date back in concept to 20th century warfare (WWI and WWII). Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range was needed.

Nowadays, there are whole families of grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade(the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade (The right tool for the job)

Sources:
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

Two reasons why not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirl to get the velocity generated for launch. This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there).

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirling process, and placing your own comrades at risk. (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade.

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of rifle grenades, which date back in concept to 20th century warfare (WWI and WWII). Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range was needed.

Nowadays, there are whole families of grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade(the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade/grenade launcher (The right tool for the job)

Sources:
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

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Two reasons notwhy not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirl to get the velocity generated for launch. This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there).

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirling process, and placing your own comrades at risk.   (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade. The modern version

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of that is the rifle grenaderifle grenades, which date back in concept to the early 20th century warfare (WWI and WWIWWII). These Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range iswas needed. There is also a

Nowadays, there are whole familyfamilies of Grenadegrenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade  (the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

Final answer: Eats(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade (The right tool for the job)

Sources:   
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

Two reasons not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirl to get the velocity generated for launch. This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there).

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirling process, and placing your own comrades at risk.  

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade. The modern version of that is the rifle grenade, which date back to the early 20th century (WWI and WWI). These grenades adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range is needed. There is also a whole family of Grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40  (the only one I have experience with) to include the M79 and M203.

Final answer: Eats up too much of the time before detonation so that the grenade won't blow up at the target

Safety for the grenadier and his allies.

Sources:  (1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade.

Two reasons why not to put a grenade in a sling, based on the fusing/arming system

(An additional reason is that there are rifle launched grenades, if you need more range).

enter image description here enter image description here

Features of a hand grenade

There is a double safety feature on a typical hand grenade that prevents it from blowing up before you have sent it to its target. The modern hand grenade uses a delayed explosion, once it is armed, as a design feature to account for the approximate time of flight of a lobbed grenade. (Most of which are descendants of the Mills Bomb from WW I).

Safety feature one. The pin holds the handle in place. Grenade not armed.
Safety feature two. The handle held down? Grenade not armed.

The handle, once the pin is pulled, can be held in place to keep the fusing from beginning the sequence that leads to detonation. (Typically 3 or 5 seconds, depends on the grenade ... there are a lot of different models)

In order to arm the grenade, you pull out the pin, and once you throw it the handle flies off. At this point you have a finite number of seconds before it blows up. (For a rifle grenade, the launch from the rifle is what begins the arming/detonation sequence).

A sling launched grenade would, due to how one uses a sling, eat up some of that time to (1) insert the grenade into the sling and then (2) spin/whirl to get the velocity generated for launch. This increases the likelihood of the grenade exploding before launch (ouch!) or exploding too soon after launch to do damage to the target. (Blow up halfway there).

A further risk is the grenade slipping out of the sling during the spin/whirling process, and placing your own comrades at risk. (Nooooo!)

Using a sling needlessly complicates the use of a modern hand grenade.

Rifle Grenades

Modern technology has arrived at a variety of rifle grenades, which date back in concept to 20th century warfare (WWI and WWII). Those grenades were adapted to be fired from a rifle if extra range was needed.

Nowadays, there are whole families of grenade launchers meant to launch longer range grenades, like the M40 grenade(the only one I have experience with), to include the M79 and M203. (Pics at that link, and I have used them both).

Final answer

(1) Using a sling eats up too much of the time before detonation, so that the grenade most likely won't blow up at the target. (Needless complexity)

(2) Safety for the grenadier and his allies. (A mistake could be lethal).

(3) If you need the range, use a rifle grenade (The right tool for the job)

Sources: 
(1) Wiki on hand grenades (where the pictures came from)
(2) (Experience) Military training received in how to use a hand grenade and grenade launchers.

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