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Losses isin reserve units during battles in Napoleonic wars

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Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace famously contains a fictional account of the Battle of Borodino in 1812. In it, Prince Andrei Bolkonsky's regiment suffers losses from hostile artillery fire while still being held in reserve behind the battles'battle's front lines.

Toward two o'clock the regiment, having already lost more than two hundred men, was moved forward [...] Without moving from that spot or firing a single shot the regiment here lost another thirdthird of its men.

If one assumes that such a regiment consisted of perhaps 2,000 to 4,000 soldiers this would amount to several hundred dead soldiers in a "safe" reserve unit. Is this a realistic order of magnitude, or does Tolstoy perhaps depict an extreme event in relation to what typically occurred during battles in that period?

Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace famously contains a fictional account of the Battle of Borodino in 1812. In it, Prince Andrei Bolkonsky's regiment suffers losses from hostile artillery fire while still being held in reserve behind the battles' front lines.

Toward two o'clock the regiment, having already lost more than two hundred men, was moved forward [...] Without moving from that spot or firing a single shot the regiment here lost another third of its men.

If one assumes that such a regiment consisted of perhaps 2,000 to 4,000 soldiers this would amount to several hundred dead soldiers in a "safe" reserve unit. Is this a realistic order of magnitude, or does Tolstoy perhaps depict an extreme event in relation to what typically occurred during battles in that period?

Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace famously contains a fictional account of the Battle of Borodino in 1812. In it, Prince Andrei Bolkonsky's regiment suffers losses from hostile artillery fire while still being held in reserve behind the battle's front lines.

Toward two o'clock the regiment, having already lost more than two hundred men, was moved forward [...] Without moving from that spot or firing a single shot the regiment here lost another third of its men.

If one assumes that such a regiment consisted of perhaps 2,000 to 4,000 soldiers this would amount to several hundred dead soldiers in a "safe" reserve unit. Is this a realistic order of magnitude, or does Tolstoy perhaps depict an extreme event in relation to what typically occurred during battles in that period?

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source | link

Losses is reserve units during battles in Napoleonic wars

Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace famously contains a fictional account of the Battle of Borodino in 1812. In it, Prince Andrei Bolkonsky's regiment suffers losses from hostile artillery fire while still being held in reserve behind the battles' front lines.

Toward two o'clock the regiment, having already lost more than two hundred men, was moved forward [...] Without moving from that spot or firing a single shot the regiment here lost another third of its men.

If one assumes that such a regiment consisted of perhaps 2,000 to 4,000 soldiers this would amount to several hundred dead soldiers in a "safe" reserve unit. Is this a realistic order of magnitude, or does Tolstoy perhaps depict an extreme event in relation to what typically occurred during battles in that period?