Tweeted twitter.com/StackHistory/status/882842918201036800
4 edited title
| link

What kinds of clothes were made at home by middle classaverage medieval women and what kinds were bought?

3 added 148 characters in body
source | link

I am aware that the medieval period is long and there may have been differences amongst countries. I don't know how much I must specify my question. So, if necessary to choose a time and place, please focus on England, 1300-1400AD.

I read on Wikipedia for this period:

The basic garments for women consisted of the smock, hose, kirtle, gown, surcoat, girdle, cape, hood, and bonnet.[4]

Unfortunately, I have only found medieval examples for the kirtles, but they seem fairly complex.

Edit: It turns out the kirtle image is from 1626, so even that is not medieval, but Renaissance clothing (many thanks to the commentator Mr Denis de Bernardy).

I am aware, that the examples from paintings might represent the most elaborate garments: Medieval woman's kirtle

Still, I wonder, how much of the attire women were able to fashion by themselves, given the cloth.

When I was little we lived in the Greek mountains and most women had sewing skills, but I think for something like the kirtle above they generally went to the seamstress.

Edit:

It turns out the kirtle image is from 1626, so even that is not medieval, but Renaissance clothing (many thanks to the commentator Mr Denis de Bernardy). I will try to find a more accurate one. Until then, I think, it may serve as an estimate for the level of sophistication.

I am aware that the medieval period is long and there may have been differences amongst countries. I don't know how much I must specify my question. So, if necessary to choose a time and place, please focus on England, 1300-1400AD.

I read on Wikipedia for this period:

The basic garments for women consisted of the smock, hose, kirtle, gown, surcoat, girdle, cape, hood, and bonnet.[4]

Unfortunately, I have only found medieval examples for the kirtles, but they seem fairly complex.

Edit: It turns out the kirtle image is from 1626, so even that is not medieval, but Renaissance clothing (many thanks to the commentator Mr Denis de Bernardy).

I am aware, that the examples from paintings might represent the most elaborate garments: Medieval woman's kirtle

Still, I wonder, how much of the attire women were able to fashion by themselves, given the cloth.

When I was little we lived in the Greek mountains and most women had sewing skills, but I think for something like the kirtle above they generally went to the seamstress.

I am aware that the medieval period is long and there may have been differences amongst countries. I don't know how much I must specify my question. So, if necessary to choose a time and place, please focus on England, 1300-1400AD.

I read on Wikipedia for this period:

The basic garments for women consisted of the smock, hose, kirtle, gown, surcoat, girdle, cape, hood, and bonnet.[4]

Unfortunately, I have only found medieval examples for the kirtles, but they seem fairly complex. I am aware, that the examples from paintings might represent the most elaborate garments: Medieval woman's kirtle

Still, I wonder, how much of the attire women were able to fashion by themselves, given the cloth.

When I was little we lived in the Greek mountains and most women had sewing skills, but I think for something like the kirtle above they generally went to the seamstress.

Edit:

It turns out the kirtle image is from 1626, so even that is not medieval, but Renaissance clothing (many thanks to the commentator Mr Denis de Bernardy). I will try to find a more accurate one. Until then, I think, it may serve as an estimate for the level of sophistication.

2 added 148 characters in body
source | link

I am aware that the medieval period is long and there may have been differences amongst countries. I don't know how much I must specify my question. So, if necessary to choose a time and place, please focus on England, 1300-1400AD.

I read on Wikipedia for this period:

The basic garments for women consisted of the smock, hose, kirtle, gown, surcoat, girdle, cape, hood, and bonnet.[4]

Unfortunately, I have only found medieval examples for the kirtles, but they seem fairly complex.

Edit: It turns out the kirtle image is from 1626, so even that is not medieval, but Renaissance clothing (many thanks to the commentator Mr Denis de Bernardy).

I am aware, that the examples from paintings might represent the most elaborate garments: Medieval woman's kirtle

Still, I wonder, how much of the attire women were able to fashion by themselves, given the cloth.

When I was little we lived in the Greek mountains and most women had sewing skills, but I think for something like the kirtle above they generally went to the seamstress.

I am aware that the medieval period is long and there may have been differences amongst countries. I don't know how much I must specify my question. So, if necessary to choose a time and place, please focus on England, 1300-1400AD.

I read on Wikipedia for this period:

The basic garments for women consisted of the smock, hose, kirtle, gown, surcoat, girdle, cape, hood, and bonnet.[4]

Unfortunately, I have only found medieval examples for the kirtles, but they seem fairly complex. I am aware, that the examples from paintings might represent the most elaborate garments: Medieval woman's kirtle

Still, I wonder, how much of the attire women were able to fashion by themselves, given the cloth.

When I was little we lived in the Greek mountains and most women had sewing skills, but I think for something like the kirtle above they generally went to the seamstress.

I am aware that the medieval period is long and there may have been differences amongst countries. I don't know how much I must specify my question. So, if necessary to choose a time and place, please focus on England, 1300-1400AD.

I read on Wikipedia for this period:

The basic garments for women consisted of the smock, hose, kirtle, gown, surcoat, girdle, cape, hood, and bonnet.[4]

Unfortunately, I have only found medieval examples for the kirtles, but they seem fairly complex.

Edit: It turns out the kirtle image is from 1626, so even that is not medieval, but Renaissance clothing (many thanks to the commentator Mr Denis de Bernardy).

I am aware, that the examples from paintings might represent the most elaborate garments: Medieval woman's kirtle

Still, I wonder, how much of the attire women were able to fashion by themselves, given the cloth.

When I was little we lived in the Greek mountains and most women had sewing skills, but I think for something like the kirtle above they generally went to the seamstress.

1
source | link