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Not a full answer, but one of the key requirements when sailing by dead-reckoning is to calculate the leeway accurately, so that the course sailed can be adjusted properly from the course steered. (For those without sailing experience, leeway is the drift downwind due to drag that reduces the velocity made good for the desired course.) This video illustrates a means of measuring leeway as the angle between a line extended dead astern from the boat with one extended along the dead water in the boat's wake.

Numerous other references on techniques for coastal navigation (usually done by dead reckoning and periodically adjusted by sight references to known landmarks) and celestial (or offshore) navigation are available on the web. Bligh and his companions would have used a combination of these techniques, along with sounding weights for determining the nature of the bottom under the boat, during the voyage to East Timor. As noted in @Steve Bird's answer, the one notable landmark encountered by which Bligh could correct the accumulated dead-reckoning errors was the Great Barrier Reef, 11 days our from their East Timor destination.

Not a full answer, but one of the key requirements when sailing by dead-reckoning is to calculate the leeway accurately, so that the course sailed can be adjusted properly from the course steered. (For those without sailing experience, leeway is the drift downwind due to drag that reduces the velocity made good for the desired course.) This video illustrates a means of measuring leeway as the angle between a line extended dead astern from the boat with one extended along the dead water in the boat's wake.

Numerous other references on techniques for coastal navigation (usually done by dead reckoning and periodically adjusted by sight references to known landmarks) and celestial (or offshore) navigation are available on the web. Bligh and his companions would have used a combination of these techniques, along with sounding weights for determining the nature of the bottom under the boat, during the voyage to East Timor.

Not a full answer, but one of the key requirements when sailing by dead-reckoning is to calculate the leeway accurately, so that the course sailed can be adjusted properly from the course steered. (For those without sailing experience, leeway is the drift downwind due to drag that reduces the velocity made good for the desired course.) This video illustrates a means of measuring leeway as the angle between a line extended dead astern from the boat with one extended along the dead water in the boat's wake.

Numerous other references on techniques for coastal navigation (usually done by dead reckoning and periodically adjusted by sight references to known landmarks) and celestial (or offshore) navigation are available on the web. Bligh and his companions would have used a combination of these techniques, along with sounding weights for determining the nature of the bottom under the boat, during the voyage to East Timor. As noted in @Steve Bird's answer, the one notable landmark encountered by which Bligh could correct the accumulated dead-reckoning errors was the Great Barrier Reef, 11 days our from their East Timor destination.

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Not a full answer, but one of the key requirements when sailing by dead-reckoning is to calculate the leeway accurately, so that the course sailed can be adjusted properly from the course steered. (For those without sailing experience, leeway is the drift downwind due to drag that reduces the velocity made good for the desired course.) This video illustrates a means of measuring leeway as the angle between a line extended dead astern from the boat with one extended along the dead water in the boat's wake.

Numerous other references on techniques for coastal navigation (usually done by dead reckoning and periodically adjusted by sight references to known landmarks) and celestial (or offshore) navigation are available on the web. Bligh and his companions would have used a combination of these techniques, along with sounding weights for determining the nature of the bottom under the boat, during the voyage to East Timor.