3 edited body
source | link

(1) Alcibiades, of course.

During the course of the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades changed his political allegiance several times. In his native Athens in the early 410s BC, he advocated an aggressive foreign policy and was a prominent proponent of the Sicilian Expedition, but he fled to Sparta after his political enemies brought charges of sacrilege against him. In Sparta, he served as a strategic adviser, proposing or supervising several major campaigns against Athens. In Sparta too, however, Alcibiades soon made powerful enemies and felt forced to defect to Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap Tissaphernes until his Athenian political allies brought about his recall. He then served as an Athenian general [...] for several years [...]

(2) George, Duke of Clarence almost fits - but maybe not quite. He sure switched sides twice but he was not given a military command upon re-defection - perhaps because there was no war going on. Had theirthere been one, I presume he would have commanded part of Edward's army.

(3) Vladimir Gil (Rodionov). He was a lieutenant colonel in the Red Army. Early in the German invasion of the Soviet Union he was captured by the Wehrmacht and joined the German side.

He quickly rose in prominence in the German service and was able to create his own SS "eastern legion"-type unit, which was eventually known as the 1-я русская национальная бригада СС «Дружина» (1st Russian National SS Brigade Druzhina).

Then, in August 1943, after some clandestine negotiation with the partisans he had been fighting so far, Gil defected back to the Soviet side with his entire unit (killing the German officers attached to it in the process), which was now promptly renamed as «1-я Антифашистская партизанская бригада» (1st Antifascist Partisan Brigade). Gil remained in command, retained his rank, and was even awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

He died of wounds sustained in action in 1944, so we cannot tell how his fate would have played out post-war but I doubt he would have been able to weasel his way out of a court-martial and possible execution. As long as the war lasted, though, he was useful to the Soviet command.

(1) Alcibiades, of course.

During the course of the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades changed his political allegiance several times. In his native Athens in the early 410s BC, he advocated an aggressive foreign policy and was a prominent proponent of the Sicilian Expedition, but he fled to Sparta after his political enemies brought charges of sacrilege against him. In Sparta, he served as a strategic adviser, proposing or supervising several major campaigns against Athens. In Sparta too, however, Alcibiades soon made powerful enemies and felt forced to defect to Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap Tissaphernes until his Athenian political allies brought about his recall. He then served as an Athenian general [...] for several years [...]

(2) George, Duke of Clarence almost fits - but maybe not quite. He sure switched sides twice but he was not given a military command upon re-defection - perhaps because there was no war going on. Had their been one, I presume he would have commanded part of Edward's army.

(3) Vladimir Gil (Rodionov). He was a lieutenant colonel in the Red Army. Early in the German invasion of the Soviet Union he was captured by the Wehrmacht and joined the German side.

He quickly rose in prominence in the German service and was able to create his own SS "eastern legion"-type unit, which was eventually known as the 1-я русская национальная бригада СС «Дружина» (1st Russian National SS Brigade Druzhina).

Then, in August 1943, after some clandestine negotiation with the partisans he had been fighting so far, Gil defected back to the Soviet side with his entire unit (killing the German officers attached to it in the process), which was now promptly renamed as «1-я Антифашистская партизанская бригада» (1st Antifascist Partisan Brigade). Gil remained in command, retained his rank, and was even awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

He died of wounds sustained in action in 1944, so we cannot tell how his fate would have played out post-war but I doubt he would have been able to weasel his way out of a court-martial and possible execution. As long as the war lasted, though, he was useful to the Soviet command.

(1) Alcibiades, of course.

During the course of the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades changed his political allegiance several times. In his native Athens in the early 410s BC, he advocated an aggressive foreign policy and was a prominent proponent of the Sicilian Expedition, but he fled to Sparta after his political enemies brought charges of sacrilege against him. In Sparta, he served as a strategic adviser, proposing or supervising several major campaigns against Athens. In Sparta too, however, Alcibiades soon made powerful enemies and felt forced to defect to Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap Tissaphernes until his Athenian political allies brought about his recall. He then served as an Athenian general [...] for several years [...]

(2) George, Duke of Clarence almost fits - but maybe not quite. He sure switched sides twice but he was not given a military command upon re-defection - perhaps because there was no war going on. Had there been one, I presume he would have commanded part of Edward's army.

(3) Vladimir Gil (Rodionov). He was a lieutenant colonel in the Red Army. Early in the German invasion of the Soviet Union he was captured by the Wehrmacht and joined the German side.

He quickly rose in prominence in the German service and was able to create his own SS "eastern legion"-type unit, which was eventually known as the 1-я русская национальная бригада СС «Дружина» (1st Russian National SS Brigade Druzhina).

Then, in August 1943, after some clandestine negotiation with the partisans he had been fighting so far, Gil defected back to the Soviet side with his entire unit (killing the German officers attached to it in the process), which was now promptly renamed as «1-я Антифашистская партизанская бригада» (1st Antifascist Partisan Brigade). Gil remained in command, retained his rank, and was even awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

He died of wounds sustained in action in 1944, so we cannot tell how his fate would have played out post-war but I doubt he would have been able to weasel his way out of a court-martial and possible execution. As long as the war lasted, though, he was useful to the Soviet command.

2 edited body
source | link

(1) Alcibiades, of course.

During the course of the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades changed his political allegiance several times. In his native Athens in the early 410s BC, he advocated an aggressive foreign policy and was a prominent proponent of the Sicilian Expedition, but he fled to Sparta after his political enemies brought charges of sacrilege against him. In Sparta, he served as a strategic adviser, proposing or supervising several major campaigns against Athens. In Sparta too, however, Alcibiades soon made powerful enemies and felt forced to defect to Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap Tissaphernes until his Athenian political allies brought about his recall. He then served as an Athenian general [...] for several years [...]

(2) George, Duke of Clarence almost fits - but maybe not quite. He sure switched sides twice but he was not given a military command upon re-defection - perhaps because there was no waswar going on. Had their been one, I presume he would have commanded part of Edward's army.

(3) Vladimir Gil (Rodionov). He was a lieutenant colonel in the Red Army. Early in the German invasion of the Soviet Union he was captured by the Wehrmacht and joined the German side.

He quickly rose in prominence in the German service and was able to create his own SS "eastern legion"-type unit, which was eventually known as the 1-я русская национальная бригада СС «Дружина» (1st Russian National SS Brigade Druzhina).

Then, in August 1943, after some clandestine negotiation with the partisans he had been fighting so far, Gil defected back to the Soviet side with his entire unit (killing the German officers attached to it in the process), which was now promptly renamed as «1-я Антифашистская партизанская бригада» (1st Antifascist Partisan Brigade). Gil remained in command, retained his rank, and was even awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

He died of wounds sustained in action in 1944, so we cannot tell how his fate would have played out post-war but I doubt he would have been able to weasel his way out of a court-martial and possible execution. As long as the war lasted, though, he was useful to the Soviet command.

(1) Alcibiades, of course.

During the course of the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades changed his political allegiance several times. In his native Athens in the early 410s BC, he advocated an aggressive foreign policy and was a prominent proponent of the Sicilian Expedition, but he fled to Sparta after his political enemies brought charges of sacrilege against him. In Sparta, he served as a strategic adviser, proposing or supervising several major campaigns against Athens. In Sparta too, however, Alcibiades soon made powerful enemies and felt forced to defect to Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap Tissaphernes until his Athenian political allies brought about his recall. He then served as an Athenian general [...] for several years [...]

(2) George, Duke of Clarence almost fits - but maybe not quite. He sure switched sides twice but he was not given a military command upon re-defection - perhaps because there was no was going on. Had their been one, I presume he would have commanded part of Edward's army.

(3) Vladimir Gil (Rodionov). He was a lieutenant colonel in the Red Army. Early in the German invasion of the Soviet Union he was captured by the Wehrmacht and joined the German side.

He quickly rose in prominence in the German service and was able to create his own SS "eastern legion"-type unit, which was eventually known as the 1-я русская национальная бригада СС «Дружина» (1st Russian National SS Brigade Druzhina).

Then, in August 1943, after some clandestine negotiation with the partisans he had been fighting so far, Gil defected back to the Soviet side with his entire unit (killing the German officers attached to it in the process), which was now promptly renamed as «1-я Антифашистская партизанская бригада» (1st Antifascist Partisan Brigade). Gil remained in command, retained his rank, and was even awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

He died of wounds sustained in action in 1944, so we cannot tell how his fate would have played out post-war but I doubt he would have been able to weasel his way out of a court-martial and possible execution. As long as the war lasted, though, he was useful to the Soviet command.

(1) Alcibiades, of course.

During the course of the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades changed his political allegiance several times. In his native Athens in the early 410s BC, he advocated an aggressive foreign policy and was a prominent proponent of the Sicilian Expedition, but he fled to Sparta after his political enemies brought charges of sacrilege against him. In Sparta, he served as a strategic adviser, proposing or supervising several major campaigns against Athens. In Sparta too, however, Alcibiades soon made powerful enemies and felt forced to defect to Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap Tissaphernes until his Athenian political allies brought about his recall. He then served as an Athenian general [...] for several years [...]

(2) George, Duke of Clarence almost fits - but maybe not quite. He sure switched sides twice but he was not given a military command upon re-defection - perhaps because there was no war going on. Had their been one, I presume he would have commanded part of Edward's army.

(3) Vladimir Gil (Rodionov). He was a lieutenant colonel in the Red Army. Early in the German invasion of the Soviet Union he was captured by the Wehrmacht and joined the German side.

He quickly rose in prominence in the German service and was able to create his own SS "eastern legion"-type unit, which was eventually known as the 1-я русская национальная бригада СС «Дружина» (1st Russian National SS Brigade Druzhina).

Then, in August 1943, after some clandestine negotiation with the partisans he had been fighting so far, Gil defected back to the Soviet side with his entire unit (killing the German officers attached to it in the process), which was now promptly renamed as «1-я Антифашистская партизанская бригада» (1st Antifascist Partisan Brigade). Gil remained in command, retained his rank, and was even awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

He died of wounds sustained in action in 1944, so we cannot tell how his fate would have played out post-war but I doubt he would have been able to weasel his way out of a court-martial and possible execution. As long as the war lasted, though, he was useful to the Soviet command.

1
source | link

(1) Alcibiades, of course.

During the course of the Peloponnesian War, Alcibiades changed his political allegiance several times. In his native Athens in the early 410s BC, he advocated an aggressive foreign policy and was a prominent proponent of the Sicilian Expedition, but he fled to Sparta after his political enemies brought charges of sacrilege against him. In Sparta, he served as a strategic adviser, proposing or supervising several major campaigns against Athens. In Sparta too, however, Alcibiades soon made powerful enemies and felt forced to defect to Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap Tissaphernes until his Athenian political allies brought about his recall. He then served as an Athenian general [...] for several years [...]

(2) George, Duke of Clarence almost fits - but maybe not quite. He sure switched sides twice but he was not given a military command upon re-defection - perhaps because there was no was going on. Had their been one, I presume he would have commanded part of Edward's army.

(3) Vladimir Gil (Rodionov). He was a lieutenant colonel in the Red Army. Early in the German invasion of the Soviet Union he was captured by the Wehrmacht and joined the German side.

He quickly rose in prominence in the German service and was able to create his own SS "eastern legion"-type unit, which was eventually known as the 1-я русская национальная бригада СС «Дружина» (1st Russian National SS Brigade Druzhina).

Then, in August 1943, after some clandestine negotiation with the partisans he had been fighting so far, Gil defected back to the Soviet side with his entire unit (killing the German officers attached to it in the process), which was now promptly renamed as «1-я Антифашистская партизанская бригада» (1st Antifascist Partisan Brigade). Gil remained in command, retained his rank, and was even awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

He died of wounds sustained in action in 1944, so we cannot tell how his fate would have played out post-war but I doubt he would have been able to weasel his way out of a court-martial and possible execution. As long as the war lasted, though, he was useful to the Soviet command.