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    Tweeted twitter.com/StackHistory/status/927749314335723520
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I know, for example, that Tom Lehrer (the comedian) went to Harvard at 15 and he said that during WW2 especially, this was not particularly unusual. It is my impression that in the 1930s and 1940s, this was how academically-gifted kids were dealt with although it was largely discontinued because of the obvious social issues that would arise although if enough kids were skipped they would have company. Even today this seems to happen occasionally but I am wondering if the practice predated the 1930s and when it was phased out.

EDIT: Very interested in non-USA information also.

I know, for example, that Tom Lehrer (the comedian) went to Harvard at 15 and he said that during WW2 especially, this was not particularly unusual. It is my impression that in the 1930s and 1940s, this was how academically-gifted kids were dealt with although it was largely discontinued because of the obvious social issues that would arise although if enough kids were skipped they would have company. Even today this seems to happen occasionally but I am wondering if the practice predated the 1930s and when it was phased out.

I know, for example, that Tom Lehrer (the comedian) went to Harvard at 15 and he said that during WW2 especially, this was not particularly unusual. It is my impression that in the 1930s and 1940s, this was how academically-gifted kids were dealt with although it was largely discontinued because of the obvious social issues that would arise although if enough kids were skipped they would have company. Even today this seems to happen occasionally but I am wondering if the practice predated the 1930s and when it was phased out.

EDIT: Very interested in non-USA information also.

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