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Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on the Silk Road, which was centered on these Iranian Oasis states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaledbest weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can soldiers”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on these states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaled weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can soldiers”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on the Silk Road, which was centered on these Iranian Oasis states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the best weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can soldiers”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

3 added 2 characters in body
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Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on these states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaled weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can armies”soldiers”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on these states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaled weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can armies”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on these states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaled weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can soldiers”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

2 deleted 19 characters in body
source | link

Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on these states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaled weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Chinese, Tibetans, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can armies”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on these states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaled weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Chinese, Tibetans, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can armies”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

Nomadic warfare constantly changed civilization. The Amorites, Aramaeans, Persians, Sarmatians, Goths*, Arabs, Hungarians, and Islamic Turks had a large impact on society before the Mongols. Nomads made Assyria, Han China, Rome, and Persia fall. Nomads had dominated the known world before. What the Mongols did is they dominated the Silk Road.

When civilizations built roads for commercial and military purposes, they provided a way for the nomadic people to infiltrate. By 1200 A.D. there was more infrastructure and interconnectedness that had been built on the revenues of the Silk Road.

The Silk Road had brought unprecedented wealth to the Central Asian states. The Mongolian conquest was the culmination of 1000 years of centripetal forces acting on these states. The first major step towards centralization was the Turkic and Islamic Empires. The Turkic Empire disintegrated, but the steppe remained Turkicized. I can’t describe all the events here, but the other important people were the Samanids, Seljuks, Qara Khanids, Qara Khitai, and Khitan Mongols. There were also centripetal forces on the Russian steppes that took place mostly under the Cuman/ Kipchack confederation. These events created larger entities that were ripe for takeover by the Mongols. It was also 1200 A.D.; political and military technologies were more advanced.

Around 1000 A.D. these conflicts became intensified and constant, and the Silk Road slowed to a trickle. Central Asia suffered economically and this facilitated the Mongolian conquests. Christendom was also eager to have someone pressuring the Turks from the East, and reached out to them on friendly terms.

The Mongols were a robust people, and the Mongolian bow was the unrivaled weapon of its day. Mongolia was a warlike place and the process of selection was intense. They were the best people for the job, but this did not guarantee their success. Having the last word in the struggle between Arabs, Iranians, and Turks in Central Asia was the key factor.** From this point, with advanced Iranian bureaucracies, they expanded outward to conquer the Silk Road. It was the culmination of Silk Road history; the element which had unified all of Asia. Before this time, there was not the infrastructure connecting all of Asia. There is an old saying; “where goods can travel, so can armies”. It took a millennium for these centripetal forces to play out.

*Goths adopted the lifestyle of the steppe when they conquered the Sarmatians.

**You mentioned the unification of the steppe as a reason. They didn’t complete this until 1241, and it was never fully under their control.

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