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The general idea behind the Electoral College is that the states pick Electors, they get 1 each for each congressmen and senator they have (iow: at least 3 for every state, more for bigger ones), and the Electoral College decides, based on majoriy vote, who is President.

Nits:

  • It is up to the states how they pick their Electors. It would be perfectly OK for the Governor or the state legislature's ruling party to just assign them, if the people of that state would put up with such a system. It's been done in the past. Right now all states allow their citizens to directly vote for electors, and in all but two states the majority candidate gets all the electors. However, that's for the states to decide. Originally, almost no states directly elected their EC representatives, so it would be fair to say that in most early elections, the EC voted for candidates that had not been voted on by "the people".
  • Electors are free to vote how they please. Half of the states try to legally require their electors to vote for who they promised to vote for, but Federal law has no such requirement.
  • They might not get to decide. If there's no majority winner, the election goes to the newly-elected House of Representatives (but on a one-vote-per-state basis). This has not happened in nearly 200 years, and really could only happen in today's universe in the case of a 270-270 tie. (There's an even more breathtakingly unlikely scenario where the Senate could end up indirectly picking the President, but let's not get into that)

The general idea behind the Electoral College is that the states pick Electors, they get 1 each for each congressmen and senator they have (iow: at least 3 for every state, more for bigger ones), and the Electoral College decides, based on majoriy vote, who is President.

Nits:

  • It is up to the states how they pick their Electors. It would be perfectly OK for the Governor or the state legislature's ruling party to just assign them, if the people of that state would put up with such a system. It's been done in the past. Right now all states allow their citizens to directly vote for electors, and in all but two states the majority candidate gets all the electors. However, that's for the states to decide. Originally, almost no states directly elected their EC representatives, so it would be fair to say that in most early elections, the EC voted for candidates that had not been voted on by "the people".
  • Electors are free to vote how they please. Half of the states try to legally require their electors to vote for who they promised to vote for, but Federal law has no such requirement.
  • They might not get to decide. If there's no majority winner, the election goes to the House of Representatives (but on a one-vote-per-state basis). This has not happened in nearly 200 years, and really could only happen in today's universe in the case of a 270-270 tie.

The general idea behind the Electoral College is that the states pick Electors, they get 1 each for each congressmen and senator they have (iow: at least 3 for every state, more for bigger ones), and the Electoral College decides, based on majoriy vote, who is President.

Nits:

  • It is up to the states how they pick their Electors. It would be perfectly OK for the Governor or the state legislature's ruling party to just assign them, if the people of that state would put up with such a system. It's been done in the past. Right now all states allow their citizens to directly vote for electors, and in all but two states the majority candidate gets all the electors. However, that's for the states to decide. Originally, almost no states directly elected their EC representatives, so it would be fair to say that in most early elections, the EC voted for candidates that had not been voted on by "the people".
  • Electors are free to vote how they please. Half of the states try to legally require their electors to vote for who they promised to vote for, but Federal law has no such requirement.
  • They might not get to decide. If there's no majority winner, the election goes to the newly-elected House of Representatives (but on a one-vote-per-state basis). This has not happened in nearly 200 years, and really could only happen in today's universe in the case of a 270-270 tie. (There's an even more breathtakingly unlikely scenario where the Senate could end up indirectly picking the President, but let's not get into that)
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The general idea behind the Electoral College is that the states pick Electors, they get 1 each for each congressmen and senator they have (iow: at least 3 for every state, more for bigger ones), and the Electoral College decides, based on majoriy vote, who is President.

Nits:

  • It is up to the states how they pick their Electors. It would be perfectly OK for the Governor or the state legislature's ruling party to just assign them, if the people of that state would put up with such a system. It's been done in the past. Right now all states allow their citizens to directly vote for electors, and in all but two states the majority candidate gets all the electors. However, that's for the states to decide. Originally, almost no states directly elected their EC representatives, so it would be fair to say that in most early elections, the EC voted for candidates that had not been voted on by "the people".
  • Electors are free to vote how they please. Half of the states try to legally require their electors to vote for who they promised to vote for, but Federal law has no such requirement.
  • They might not get to decide. If there's no majority winner, the election goes to the House of Representatives (but on a one-vote-per-state basis). This has not happened in nearly 200 years, and really could only happen in today's universe in the case of a 270-270 tie.