The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
    Tweeted twitter.com/StackHistory/status/985953314767560715
5 typos, added link
source | link

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser"Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and and it is used in this exact way in Germany.

Why is "Kaiser" used for German emperors, but the English word "Emperor" is used for other (non-English) emperors? (e.g. Chandragupta, Napoleon and others)

(Note that the question may be based on a false premise; as noted in the referenced article, Napoleon was "Imperator", the emperor of the Bulgarians was "Czar", the emperor of Spain had a Spanish title; I'm not sure how the History channelChannel grade documentaries refer to them.)

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and it is used in this exact way in Germany.

Why is "Kaiser" used for German emperors, but the English word "Emperor" is used for other (non-English) emperors? (e.g. Chandragupta, Napoleon and others)

(Note that the question may be based on a false premise; as noted in the referenced article, Napoleon was "Imperator", the emperor of the Bulgarians was "Czar", the emperor of Spain had a Spanish title; I'm not sure how the History channel grade documentaries refer to them)

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though, and it is used in this exact way in Germany.

Why is "Kaiser" used for German emperors, but the English word "Emperor" is used for other (non-English) emperors? (e.g. Chandragupta, Napoleon and others)

(Note that the question may be based on a false premise; as noted in the referenced article, Napoleon was "Imperator", the emperor of the Bulgarians was "Czar", the emperor of Spain had a Spanish title; I'm not sure how the History Channel grade documentaries refer to them.)

    Mod Moved Comments To Chat
4 added 688 characters in body
source | link

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and it is used in this exact way in Germany.

Why is "Kaiser" used for German emperors, but the English word "Emperor" is used for other (non-English) emperors? (e.g. Chandragupta, Napoleon and others)

(Note that the question may be based on a false premise; as noted in the referenced article, Napoleon was "Imperator", the emperor of the Bulgarians was "Czar", the emperor of Spain had a Spanish title; I'm not sure how the History channel grade documentaries refer to them)

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and it is used in this exact way in Germany.

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and it is used in this exact way in Germany.

Why is "Kaiser" used for German emperors, but the English word "Emperor" is used for other (non-English) emperors? (e.g. Chandragupta, Napoleon and others)

(Note that the question may be based on a false premise; as noted in the referenced article, Napoleon was "Imperator", the emperor of the Bulgarians was "Czar", the emperor of Spain had a Spanish title; I'm not sure how the History channel grade documentaries refer to them)

3 deleted 279 characters in body
source | link

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and it is used in this exact way in Germany. I find it quite obvious that this is to imply 'something' about German history (namely, that it was all about Hitler even before Hitler). Is there another, better reason? Incidently, Hitler is called "the Führer" is such coverage, which cites the exact German term for "leader".

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and it is used in this exact way in Germany. I find it quite obvious that this is to imply 'something' about German history (namely, that it was all about Hitler even before Hitler). Is there another, better reason? Incidently, Hitler is called "the Führer" is such coverage, which cites the exact German term for "leader".

It is common, in History-Channel-Grade English language documentaries at least, to refer to German emperors, and William II in particular, as "the Kaiser". This is just the German term for emperor though,and it is used in this exact way in Germany.

2 corrected spelling
source | link
1
source | link