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Karl Oskar Leon of Gottenborg, Sweden, (apparently owning a US company) filed for a US patent titled Torpedo and other Submarine Apparatus 11 February 1908:

The main object of the invention is to provide a torpedo adapted to automatically steer, without any control, toward the object to be destroyed, and to change its course according to the movement of the said object.

A torpedo constructed according to this invention is especially adapted to detect submarine boats or other hostile vessels and to automatically steer toward the same, whatever be the original course of the torpedo. In torpedoes of the kind described in my earlier patent application Serial No. 400215, filed November 1, 1907, (patented March 22, 1910, No. 952,451,) special arrangements may be provided for causing the torpedo, after the propulsion of the same has ceased and it has taken up a vertical position, at a predetermined depth of submersion, to again start, as soon as a vessel enters its sphere of action, and steer for the vessel to destroy it.

...

The invention consists, chiefly, in so placing, on the torpedo, suitably at its fore end, a number of microphones, telephone receivers, or other receivers sensible to vibrations of the water, such as vibration of sound, or the like, that the said receivers are adapted to be actuated by vibrations issuing from the object to be destroyed, each receiver being connected, by suitable apparatus, to one or more of the devices (steering, propulsion, exploding or other devices) of the torpedo in such a manner that the said device or devices will be actuated, as soon as the receiver is made active.

For more information on the above see Providing a Torpedo with Ears in The Book of Modern Marvels (1917). Work orof Christian Berger of Hungary and John Gardner of England is also discussed.

John Hays Hammond, Jr. of Gloucester, Massachusetts filed for a patent titled Echo Torpedo 2 April 1928:

This invention relates to the control of moving bodies and, more particularly, to an automatic means for controlling the direction of a torpedo and for causing the same to pursue an enemy ship.

The invention provides a mechanism whereby a series of high frequency compressional waves are emitted from a torpedo and impressed upon a surrounding medium. These waves are reflected from a solid object such as an enemy ship and are again impressed upon the torpedo where they are picked up by suitable microphones and caused to actuate relay mechanisms for operating the rudder.

The usual gyroscopic mechanism is employed for maintaining a torpedo on a preselected course until in the proximity of the target. It is then directed by the reflected compressional waves and caused to automatically follow the target until a hit is obtained.

...

Alfred N. Goldsmith of New York, New York filed for a patent 12 December 1935.

Such a control system readily lends itself to ... acoustical control of torpedos, and automatic steering

...

my invention is to provide a homing torpedo control system

Karl Oskar Leon of Gottenborg, Sweden, (apparently owning a US company) filed for a US patent titled Torpedo and other Submarine Apparatus 11 February 1908:

The main object of the invention is to provide a torpedo adapted to automatically steer, without any control, toward the object to be destroyed, and to change its course according to the movement of the said object.

A torpedo constructed according to this invention is especially adapted to detect submarine boats or other hostile vessels and to automatically steer toward the same, whatever be the original course of the torpedo. In torpedoes of the kind described in my earlier patent application Serial No. 400215, filed November 1, 1907, (patented March 22, 1910, No. 952,451,) special arrangements may be provided for causing the torpedo, after the propulsion of the same has ceased and it has taken up a vertical position, at a predetermined depth of submersion, to again start, as soon as a vessel enters its sphere of action, and steer for the vessel to destroy it.

...

The invention consists, chiefly, in so placing, on the torpedo, suitably at its fore end, a number of microphones, telephone receivers, or other receivers sensible to vibrations of the water, such as vibration of sound, or the like, that the said receivers are adapted to be actuated by vibrations issuing from the object to be destroyed, each receiver being connected, by suitable apparatus, to one or more of the devices (steering, propulsion, exploding or other devices) of the torpedo in such a manner that the said device or devices will be actuated, as soon as the receiver is made active.

For more information on the above see Providing a Torpedo with Ears in The Book of Modern Marvels (1917). Work or Christian Berger of Hungary and John Gardner of England is also discussed.

John Hays Hammond, Jr. of Gloucester, Massachusetts filed for a patent titled Echo Torpedo 2 April 1928:

This invention relates to the control of moving bodies and, more particularly, to an automatic means for controlling the direction of a torpedo and for causing the same to pursue an enemy ship.

The invention provides a mechanism whereby a series of high frequency compressional waves are emitted from a torpedo and impressed upon a surrounding medium. These waves are reflected from a solid object such as an enemy ship and are again impressed upon the torpedo where they are picked up by suitable microphones and caused to actuate relay mechanisms for operating the rudder.

The usual gyroscopic mechanism is employed for maintaining a torpedo on a preselected course until in the proximity of the target. It is then directed by the reflected compressional waves and caused to automatically follow the target until a hit is obtained.

...

Alfred N. Goldsmith of New York, New York filed for a patent 12 December 1935.

Such a control system readily lends itself to ... acoustical control of torpedos, and automatic steering

...

my invention is to provide a homing torpedo control system

Karl Oskar Leon of Gottenborg, Sweden, (apparently owning a US company) filed for a US patent titled Torpedo and other Submarine Apparatus 11 February 1908:

The main object of the invention is to provide a torpedo adapted to automatically steer, without any control, toward the object to be destroyed, and to change its course according to the movement of the said object.

A torpedo constructed according to this invention is especially adapted to detect submarine boats or other hostile vessels and to automatically steer toward the same, whatever be the original course of the torpedo. In torpedoes of the kind described in my earlier patent application Serial No. 400215, filed November 1, 1907, (patented March 22, 1910, No. 952,451,) special arrangements may be provided for causing the torpedo, after the propulsion of the same has ceased and it has taken up a vertical position, at a predetermined depth of submersion, to again start, as soon as a vessel enters its sphere of action, and steer for the vessel to destroy it.

...

The invention consists, chiefly, in so placing, on the torpedo, suitably at its fore end, a number of microphones, telephone receivers, or other receivers sensible to vibrations of the water, such as vibration of sound, or the like, that the said receivers are adapted to be actuated by vibrations issuing from the object to be destroyed, each receiver being connected, by suitable apparatus, to one or more of the devices (steering, propulsion, exploding or other devices) of the torpedo in such a manner that the said device or devices will be actuated, as soon as the receiver is made active.

For more information on the above see Providing a Torpedo with Ears in The Book of Modern Marvels (1917). Work of Christian Berger of Hungary and John Gardner of England is also discussed.

John Hays Hammond, Jr. of Gloucester, Massachusetts filed for a patent titled Echo Torpedo 2 April 1928:

This invention relates to the control of moving bodies and, more particularly, to an automatic means for controlling the direction of a torpedo and for causing the same to pursue an enemy ship.

The invention provides a mechanism whereby a series of high frequency compressional waves are emitted from a torpedo and impressed upon a surrounding medium. These waves are reflected from a solid object such as an enemy ship and are again impressed upon the torpedo where they are picked up by suitable microphones and caused to actuate relay mechanisms for operating the rudder.

The usual gyroscopic mechanism is employed for maintaining a torpedo on a preselected course until in the proximity of the target. It is then directed by the reflected compressional waves and caused to automatically follow the target until a hit is obtained.

...

Alfred N. Goldsmith of New York, New York filed for a patent 12 December 1935.

Such a control system readily lends itself to ... acoustical control of torpedos, and automatic steering

...

my invention is to provide a homing torpedo control system

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Karl Oskar Leon of Gottenborg, Sweden, (apparently owning a US company) filed for a US patent titled Torpedo and other Submarine Apparatus 11 February 1908:

The main object of the invention is to provide a torpedo adapted to automatically steer, without any control, toward the object to be destroyed, and to change its course according to the movement of the said object.

A torpedo constructed according to this invention is especially adapted to detect submarine boats or other hostile vessels and to automatically steer toward the same, whatever be the original course of the torpedo. In torpedoes of the kind described in my earlier patent application Serial No. 400215, filed November 1, 1907, (patented March 22, 1910, No. 952,451,) special arrangements may be provided for causing the torpedo, after the propulsion of the same has ceased and it has taken up a vertical position, at a predetermined depth of submersion, to again start, as soon as a vessel enters its sphere of action, and steer for the vessel to destroy it.

...

The invention consists, chiefly, in so placing, on the torpedo, suitably at its fore end, a number of microphones, telephone receivers, or other receivers sensible to vibrations of the water, such as vibration of sound, or the like, that the said receivers are adapted to be actuated by vibrations issuing from the object to be destroyed, each receiver being connected, by suitable apparatus, to one or more of the devices (steering, propulsion, exploding or other devices) of the torpedo in such a manner that the said device or devices will be actuated, as soon as the receiver is made active.

For more information on the above see Providing a Torpedo with Ears in The Book of Modern Marvels (1917). Work or Christian Berger of Hungary and John Gardner of England is also discussed.

John Hays Hammond, Jr. of Gloucester, Massachusetts filed for a patent titled Echo Torpedo 2 April 1928:

This invention relates to the control of moving bodies and, more particularly, to an automatic means for controlling the direction of a torpedo and for causing the same to pursue an enemy ship.

The invention provides a mechanism whereby a series of high frequency compressional waves are emitted from a torpedo and impressed upon a surrounding medium. These waves are reflected from a solid object such as an enemy ship and are again impressed upon the torpedo where they are picked up by suitable microphones and caused to actuate relay mechanisms for operating the rudder.

The usual gyroscopic mechanism is employed for maintaining a torpedo on a preselected course until in the proximity of the target. It is then directed by the reflected compressional waves and caused to automatically follow the target until a hit is obtained.

...

Alfred N. Goldsmith of New York, New York filed for a patent 12 December 1935.

Such a control system readily lends itself to ... acoustical control of torpedos, and automatic steering

...

my invention is to provide a homing torpedo control system

Karl Oskar Leon of Gottenborg, Sweden, (apparently owning a US company) filed for a US patent titled Torpedo and other Submarine Apparatus 11 February 1908:

The main object of the invention is to provide a torpedo adapted to automatically steer, without any control, toward the object to be destroyed, and to change its course according to the movement of the said object.

A torpedo constructed according to this invention is especially adapted to detect submarine boats or other hostile vessels and to automatically steer toward the same, whatever be the original course of the torpedo. In torpedoes of the kind described in my earlier patent application Serial No. 400215, filed November 1, 1907, (patented March 22, 1910, No. 952,451,) special arrangements may be provided for causing the torpedo, after the propulsion of the same has ceased and it has taken up a vertical position, at a predetermined depth of submersion, to again start, as soon as a vessel enters its sphere of action, and steer for the vessel to destroy it.

...

The invention consists, chiefly, in so placing, on the torpedo, suitably at its fore end, a number of microphones, telephone receivers, or other receivers sensible to vibrations of the water, such as vibration of sound, or the like, that the said receivers are adapted to be actuated by vibrations issuing from the object to be destroyed, each receiver being connected, by suitable apparatus, to one or more of the devices (steering, propulsion, exploding or other devices) of the torpedo in such a manner that the said device or devices will be actuated, as soon as the receiver is made active.

John Hays Hammond, Jr. of Gloucester, Massachusetts filed for a patent titled Echo Torpedo 2 April 1928:

This invention relates to the control of moving bodies and, more particularly, to an automatic means for controlling the direction of a torpedo and for causing the same to pursue an enemy ship.

The invention provides a mechanism whereby a series of high frequency compressional waves are emitted from a torpedo and impressed upon a surrounding medium. These waves are reflected from a solid object such as an enemy ship and are again impressed upon the torpedo where they are picked up by suitable microphones and caused to actuate relay mechanisms for operating the rudder.

The usual gyroscopic mechanism is employed for maintaining a torpedo on a preselected course until in the proximity of the target. It is then directed by the reflected compressional waves and caused to automatically follow the target until a hit is obtained.

...

Alfred N. Goldsmith of New York, New York filed for a patent 12 December 1935.

Such a control system readily lends itself to ... acoustical control of torpedos, and automatic steering

...

my invention is to provide a homing torpedo control system

Karl Oskar Leon of Gottenborg, Sweden, (apparently owning a US company) filed for a US patent titled Torpedo and other Submarine Apparatus 11 February 1908:

The main object of the invention is to provide a torpedo adapted to automatically steer, without any control, toward the object to be destroyed, and to change its course according to the movement of the said object.

A torpedo constructed according to this invention is especially adapted to detect submarine boats or other hostile vessels and to automatically steer toward the same, whatever be the original course of the torpedo. In torpedoes of the kind described in my earlier patent application Serial No. 400215, filed November 1, 1907, (patented March 22, 1910, No. 952,451,) special arrangements may be provided for causing the torpedo, after the propulsion of the same has ceased and it has taken up a vertical position, at a predetermined depth of submersion, to again start, as soon as a vessel enters its sphere of action, and steer for the vessel to destroy it.

...

The invention consists, chiefly, in so placing, on the torpedo, suitably at its fore end, a number of microphones, telephone receivers, or other receivers sensible to vibrations of the water, such as vibration of sound, or the like, that the said receivers are adapted to be actuated by vibrations issuing from the object to be destroyed, each receiver being connected, by suitable apparatus, to one or more of the devices (steering, propulsion, exploding or other devices) of the torpedo in such a manner that the said device or devices will be actuated, as soon as the receiver is made active.

For more information on the above see Providing a Torpedo with Ears in The Book of Modern Marvels (1917). Work or Christian Berger of Hungary and John Gardner of England is also discussed.

John Hays Hammond, Jr. of Gloucester, Massachusetts filed for a patent titled Echo Torpedo 2 April 1928:

This invention relates to the control of moving bodies and, more particularly, to an automatic means for controlling the direction of a torpedo and for causing the same to pursue an enemy ship.

The invention provides a mechanism whereby a series of high frequency compressional waves are emitted from a torpedo and impressed upon a surrounding medium. These waves are reflected from a solid object such as an enemy ship and are again impressed upon the torpedo where they are picked up by suitable microphones and caused to actuate relay mechanisms for operating the rudder.

The usual gyroscopic mechanism is employed for maintaining a torpedo on a preselected course until in the proximity of the target. It is then directed by the reflected compressional waves and caused to automatically follow the target until a hit is obtained.

...

Alfred N. Goldsmith of New York, New York filed for a patent 12 December 1935.

Such a control system readily lends itself to ... acoustical control of torpedos, and automatic steering

...

my invention is to provide a homing torpedo control system

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source | link

Karl Oskar Leon of Gottenborg, Sweden, (apparently owning a US company) filed for a US patent titled Torpedo and other Submarine Apparatus 11 February 1908:

The main object of the invention is to provide a torpedo adapted to automatically steer, without any control, toward the object to be destroyed, and to change its course according to the movement of the said object.

A torpedo constructed according to this invention is especially adapted to detect submarine boats or other hostile vessels and to automatically steer toward the same, whatever be the original course of the torpedo. In torpedoes of the kind described in my earlier patent application Serial No. 400215, filed November 1, 1907, (patented March 22, 1910, No. 952,451,) special arrangements may be provided for causing the torpedo, after the propulsion of the same has ceased and it has taken up a vertical position, at a predetermined depth of submersion, to again start, as soon as a vessel enters its sphere of action, and steer for the vessel to destroy it.

...

The invention consists, chiefly, in so placing, on the torpedo, suitably at its fore end, a number of microphones, telephone receivers, or other receivers sensible to vibrations of the water, such as vibration of sound, or the like, that the said receivers are adapted to be actuated by vibrations issuing from the object to be destroyed, each receiver being connected, by suitable apparatus, to one or more of the devices (steering, propulsion, exploding or other devices) of the torpedo in such a manner that the said device or devices will be actuated, as soon as the receiver is made active.

John Hays Hammond, Jr. of Gloucester, Massachusetts filed for a patent titled Echo Torpedo 2 April 1928:

This invention relates to the control of moving bodies and, more particularly, to an automatic means for controlling the direction of a torpedo and for causing the same to pursue an enemy ship.

The invention provides a mechanism whereby a series of high frequency compressional waves are emitted from a torpedo and impressed upon a surrounding medium. These waves are reflected from a solid object such as an enemy ship and are again impressed upon the torpedo where they are picked up by suitable microphones and caused to actuate relay mechanisms for operating the rudder.

The usual gyroscopic mechanism is employed for maintaining a torpedo on a preselected course until in the proximity of the target. It is then directed by the reflected compressional waves and caused to automatically follow the target until a hit is obtained.

...

Alfred N. Goldsmith of New York, New York filed for a patent 12 December 1935.

Such a control system readily lends itself to ... acoustical control of torpedos, and automatic steering

...

my invention is to provide a homing torpedo control system