2 Fixing botanical nomenclature
source | link

Demonstrably false.

While it is true that the capsicumCapsicum familygenus (as in chili and the like) comes from Latin America, the piperPiper familygenus ("pepper" in its various forms) as well as ginger is native to Asia. Their use in Europe predates the Columbian Exchange by over a thousand years (pepper being rare, but known and available via the Silk Road) and at least 3,000 years (probably much more) in Asia. Ginger has a long history of being used for making spicy food in lack of pepper (which obviously means pepper must have been known).

I wouldn't be able to tell how long exactly pepper has been known, or available in Europe (but surely since at least the Tang dynasty since there's written records on trade with the Byzantine Empire), but Óc Eo provides evidence of trade with Rome even before the second century, so...

That aside, the mere name piperPiper is a dead giveaway since it's a Sanscrit word. Sanscrit has been spoken during the last 3,000-4,000 or so years in what region again... Latin America? Well, no. Look farther east.
The German translation of "go jump in the lake" which re-translates literally to to "go where the pepper grows" (= India) is a similar hint.

Demonstrably false.

While it is true that the capsicum family (as in chili and the like) comes from Latin America, the piper family ("pepper" in its various forms) as well as ginger is native to Asia. Their use in Europe predates the Columbian Exchange by over a thousand years (pepper being rare, but known and available via the Silk Road) and at least 3,000 years (probably much more) in Asia. Ginger has a long history of being used for making spicy food in lack of pepper (which obviously means pepper must have been known).

I wouldn't be able to tell how long exactly pepper has been known, or available in Europe (but surely since at least the Tang dynasty since there's written records on trade with the Byzantine Empire), but Óc Eo provides evidence of trade with Rome even before the second century, so...

That aside, the mere name piper is a dead giveaway since it's a Sanscrit word. Sanscrit has been spoken during the last 3,000-4,000 or so years in what region again... Latin America? Well, no. Look farther east.
The German translation of "go jump in the lake" which re-translates literally to to "go where the pepper grows" (= India) is a similar hint.

Demonstrably false.

While it is true that the Capsicum genus (as in chili and the like) comes from Latin America, the Piper genus ("pepper" in its various forms) as well as ginger is native to Asia. Their use in Europe predates the Columbian Exchange by over a thousand years (pepper being rare, but known and available via the Silk Road) and at least 3,000 years (probably much more) in Asia. Ginger has a long history of being used for making spicy food in lack of pepper (which obviously means pepper must have been known).

I wouldn't be able to tell how long exactly pepper has been known, or available in Europe (but surely since at least the Tang dynasty since there's written records on trade with the Byzantine Empire), but Óc Eo provides evidence of trade with Rome even before the second century, so...

That aside, the mere name Piper is a dead giveaway since it's a Sanscrit word. Sanscrit has been spoken during the last 3,000-4,000 or so years in what region again... Latin America? Well, no. Look farther east.
The German translation of "go jump in the lake" which re-translates literally to to "go where the pepper grows" (= India) is a similar hint.

1
source | link

Demonstrably false.

While it is true that the capsicum family (as in chili and the like) comes from Latin America, the piper family ("pepper" in its various forms) as well as ginger is native to Asia. Their use in Europe predates the Columbian Exchange by over a thousand years (pepper being rare, but known and available via the Silk Road) and at least 3,000 years (probably much more) in Asia. Ginger has a long history of being used for making spicy food in lack of pepper (which obviously means pepper must have been known).

I wouldn't be able to tell how long exactly pepper has been known, or available in Europe (but surely since at least the Tang dynasty since there's written records on trade with the Byzantine Empire), but Óc Eo provides evidence of trade with Rome even before the second century, so...

That aside, the mere name piper is a dead giveaway since it's a Sanscrit word. Sanscrit has been spoken during the last 3,000-4,000 or so years in what region again... Latin America? Well, no. Look farther east.
The German translation of "go jump in the lake" which re-translates literally to to "go where the pepper grows" (= India) is a similar hint.