4 fixed grammar and typos
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It's probably nonsense, but itsit's nonsense with an interesting history.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley, and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive-destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So, the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So whereWhere did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and dairy (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I strongly reccomendrecommend you not to try it). So itsThus, it's clear heCaesar didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly—particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who—who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware-aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

It's probably nonsense, but its nonsense with an interesting history.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and dairy (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I strongly reccomend you not to try it). So its clear he didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

It's probably nonsense, but it's nonsense with an interesting history.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley, and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally-destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So, the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

Where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and dairy (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I strongly recommend you not to try it). Thus, it's clear Caesar didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars—particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers)—who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally-aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

3 added 2 characters in body
source | link

It's probably nonsense, but its nonsense with an interesting history.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and milkdairy (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I strongly reccomend you not to try it). So its clear he didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

It's probably nonsense, but its nonsense with an interesting history.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and milk (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I strongly reccomend you not to try it). So its clear he didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

It's probably nonsense, but its nonsense with an interesting history.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and dairy (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I strongly reccomend you not to try it). So its clear he didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

2 added 93 characters in body
source | link

It's probably nonsense, but its nonsense with an interesting vintagehistory.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherersportrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and milk (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I highly encouragestrongly reccomend you not to try it). So its clear he didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

It's probably nonsense, but its nonsense with an interesting vintage.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and milk (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I highly encourage you not to try it). So its clear he didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

It's probably nonsense, but its nonsense with an interesting history.

The actual ancient Germanics were herders and farmers, with cattle, barley and wheat as their staples. Given the natural woodlands of the areas they inhabited, this generally involved slash-and-burn agriculture, which is pretty much the most environmentally destructive practice within the capabilities of the ancients. This slowly deforested Europe, eventually turning the entire European Plain from forest into farm and ranchland. There is some primeval forest left in Europe, but not much. So the claim that they were somehow ancient environmentalists is laughable.

So where did this laughable idea come from? It is true that Caesar portrayed them as hunter-gatherers, but he also said they lived mostly off of meat and milk (if you've never tried "gathering" milk from a wild animal, I strongly reccomend you not to try it). So its clear he didn't have a 100% accurate idea of their lifestyle.

However, it was Renaissance scholars, particularly nationalist German ones (and sympathetic English writers), who popularized and expanded on the idea that Germanics were hyper-environmentally aware hunter-gatherers. They invented the idea of the Noble Savage, and applied it to both Germanics and Native Americans (who were also largely farmers, not hunter-gatherers). Some would argue this process never really stopped, and the trope continues today.

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