4 Added link to article in Politico Magazine
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This actAct officially established the army under the Constitution of the United States.


Some of the background that led up to that Act is briefly described in the 2016 article 'Congress establishes the U.S. Army, Sept. 29, 1789' in Politico Magazine.

 

This act officially established the army under the Constitution of the United States.

This Act officially established the army under the Constitution of the United States.


Some of the background that led up to that Act is briefly described in the 2016 article 'Congress establishes the U.S. Army, Sept. 29, 1789' in Politico Magazine.

 
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tl;dr

One might reasonably argue that the United States Army has existed since 29 September 1789, and has been a 'truly federal force' since 5 March 1792.


However, the resolution of 3 October 1787 made it clear that the army was composed of state militias, and even gave a breakdown of how those troops were to be apportioned between the states, so perhaps may not quite meet theyour criteria as a 'truly federal army'.

On 5 March 17925 March 1792, Congress passed 'An act for making farther and more effectual provision for the protection of the frontiers of the United States'.

 

So one might argue that the US Army has been a truly federal force since 5 March 1792.So one might reasonably argue that the United States Army has existed since 29 September 1789, and has been a 'truly federal force' since 5 March 1792.

However, the resolution of 3 October 1787 made it clear that the army was composed of state militias, and even gave a breakdown of how those troops were to be apportioned between the states, so perhaps may not quite meet the criteria as a 'truly federal army'.

On 5 March 1792, Congress passed 'An act for making farther and more effectual provision for the protection of the frontiers of the United States'.

So one might argue that the US Army has been a truly federal force since 5 March 1792.

tl;dr

One might reasonably argue that the United States Army has existed since 29 September 1789, and has been a 'truly federal force' since 5 March 1792.


However, the resolution of 3 October 1787 made it clear that the army was composed of state militias, and even gave a breakdown of how those troops were to be apportioned between the states, so perhaps may not quite meet your criteria as a 'truly federal army'.

On 5 March 1792, Congress passed 'An act for making farther and more effectual provision for the protection of the frontiers of the United States'.

 

So one might reasonably argue that the United States Army has existed since 29 September 1789, and has been a 'truly federal force' since 5 March 1792.

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At what point did the United States have a truly federal army?

On 29 September 178929 September 1789 the First United States Congress passed 'An act to recognize and adapt to the Constitution of the United States, the establishment of the troops raised under the resolves of the United States in Congress assembled.'. The act was passed on the final day of its first session and states:

However, the resolution of 3 October 1787 made it clear that the army was composed of state militias, and even gave a breakdown of how those troops were to be apportioned between the states, so perhaps may not quite meet the criteria as a 'truly federal army'.

This was significant in that the Army it authorised was to be a body of professionally trained soldiers, rather than the state militias which had previously formed the basis of the Army. As such, they were recruited by the Federal government, rather than being raised by the individual states As such, they were recruited by the Federal government, rather than being raised by the individual states, which is what I suspect you mean when you say "truly a federal force".

As the Wikipedia article notes, an Act of Congress dated 3 March 1795 and titled 'An act for continuing and regulating the Military Establishment of the United StatesStates, and for repealing sundry acts heretofore passed on that subject' allowed the Legion to grow in size:

So one might argue that the US Army has been a truly federal force since 5 March 1792.

Are there still remnants of some per state divisions today?

On 29 September 1789 the First United States Congress passed 'An act to recognize and adapt to the Constitution of the United States, the establishment of the troops raised under the resolves of the United States in Congress assembled.'. The act was passed on the final day of its first session and states:

However, the resolution of 3 October 1787 made it clear that the army was composed of state militias, and even gave a breakdown of how those troops were to be apportioned between the states.

This was significant in that the Army it authorised was to be a body of professionally trained soldiers, rather than the state militias which had previously formed the basis of the Army. As such, they were recruited by the Federal government, rather than being raised by the individual states, which is what I suspect you mean when you say "truly a federal force".

As the Wikipedia article notes, an Act of Congress dated 3 March 1795 and titled 'An act for continuing and regulating the Military Establishment of the United States, and for repealing sundry acts heretofore passed on that subject' allowed the Legion to grow in size:

At what point did the United States have a truly federal army?

On 29 September 1789 the First United States Congress passed 'An act to recognize and adapt to the Constitution of the United States, the establishment of the troops raised under the resolves of the United States in Congress assembled.'. The act was passed on the final day of its first session and states:

However, the resolution of 3 October 1787 made it clear that the army was composed of state militias, and even gave a breakdown of how those troops were to be apportioned between the states, so perhaps may not quite meet the criteria as a 'truly federal army'.

This was significant in that the Army it authorised was to be a body of professionally trained soldiers, rather than the state militias which had previously formed the basis of the Army. As such, they were recruited by the Federal government, rather than being raised by the individual states, which is what I suspect you mean when you say "truly a federal force".

As the Wikipedia article notes, an Act of Congress dated 3 March 1795 and titled 'An act for continuing and regulating the Military Establishment of the United States, and for repealing sundry acts heretofore passed on that subject' allowed the Legion to grow in size:

So one might argue that the US Army has been a truly federal force since 5 March 1792.

Are there still remnants of some per state divisions today?

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