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Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simplyorganization, motivation fed by religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time by any of their neighbors. If we compare Christianity over it's first 200, 400, or 1000 years with the achievements of Islam over it's first 100 years their simple is no comparison. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Over the first 1000 years Christian Kingdoms of western Europe would still be rooted in the dark ages. Alternatively Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith. Within 100 years of Mohommed's death, The Islamic Kingdom or Caliphate was already into it's golden age.   Organization, motivation, and clarity of vision.

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammed died in June 8, 632 AD, the previous year, and that Mohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Mohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge (Oct 28, 312 AD). The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine under the sign of the cross were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified. Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate people to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongol invasion of the Caliphate.

A potent and attractive religious package with militant fervor built-in. It would be centuries before Islam encountered a similar militant religious package facing off against them.

Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simply religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time. If we compare Christianity over it's first 200, 400, or 1000 years with the achievements of Islam over it's first 100 years their simple is no comparison. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Over the first 1000 years Christian Kingdoms of western Europe would still be rooted in the dark ages. Alternatively Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith. Within 100 years of Mohommed's death, The Islamic Kingdom or Caliphate was already into it's golden age.  

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammed died in June 8, 632 AD and that Mohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Mohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge (Oct 28, 312 AD). The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine under the sign of the cross were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified. Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate people to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongol invasion of the Caliphate.

A potent and attractive religious package with militant fervor built-in. It would be centuries before Islam encountered a similar militant religious package facing off against them.

Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was organization, motivation fed by religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time by any of their neighbors. If we compare Christianity over it's first 200, 400, or 1000 years with the achievements of Islam over it's first 100 years their simple is no comparison. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Over the first 1000 years Christian Kingdoms of western Europe would still be rooted in the dark ages. Alternatively Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith. Within 100 years of Mohommed's death, The Islamic Kingdom or Caliphate was already into it's golden age. Organization, motivation, and clarity of vision.

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammed died in June 8, 632 AD, the previous year, and that Mohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Mohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge (Oct 28, 312 AD). The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine under the sign of the cross were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified. Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate people to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongol invasion of the Caliphate.

A potent and attractive religious package with militant fervor built-in. It would be centuries before Islam encountered a similar militant religious package facing off against them.

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Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simply religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time. If we compare Christianity over it's first 200, 400, or 1000 years with the achievements of Islam over it's first 100 years their simple is no comparison. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Mohammed Over the first 1000 years Christian Kingdoms of western Europe would still be rooted in the dark ages. Alternatively Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith.   Within 100 years of Mohommed's death, The Islamic Kingdom or Caliphate was already into it's golden age.

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammed died in June 8, 632 AD and that Mohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Mohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge (Oct 28, 312 AD). The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine under the sign of the cross were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified,. Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.  

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate their soldierspeople to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongol invasion of the Caliphate. Then it was lights out

A potent and attractive religious package with militant fervor built-in.   It would be centuries before Islam encountered a similar militant religious package facing off against them.

Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simply religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith.  

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammed died in June 8, 632 AD and that Mohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Mohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge. The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified, Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.  

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate their soldiers to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongol invasion of the Caliphate. Then it was lights out.  

Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simply religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time. If we compare Christianity over it's first 200, 400, or 1000 years with the achievements of Islam over it's first 100 years their simple is no comparison. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Over the first 1000 years Christian Kingdoms of western Europe would still be rooted in the dark ages. Alternatively Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith. Within 100 years of Mohommed's death, The Islamic Kingdom or Caliphate was already into it's golden age.

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammed died in June 8, 632 AD and that Mohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Mohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge (Oct 28, 312 AD). The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine under the sign of the cross were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified. Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate people to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongol invasion of the Caliphate.

A potent and attractive religious package with militant fervor built-in. It would be centuries before Islam encountered a similar militant religious package facing off against them.

4 Unified spelling of Mohammed, adjust according to taste, but uniformly please
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Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simply religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Mohamed Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith.

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that MohammadMohammed died in June 8, 632 AD and that MuhammadMohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When MuhamadMohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge. The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified, Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Muhammad Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation.? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate their soldiers to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the MongolsMongol invasion of the Caliphate. Then it was lights out.

Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simply religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Mohamed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith.

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammad died in June 8, 632 AD and that Muhammad spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Muhamad died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge. The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified, Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Muhammad their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation. The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate their soldiers to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongols invasion of the Caliphate. Then it was lights out.

Question: So the question is: What disruption, or innovation, or disruptive innovation did the advent of Islam bring, and render on the Arabs, that a nation of nomads went up and annihilated Great Empires, conquered great lengths of Earths in such short period of time (again, some 40 years), even just after emerging as a nation? And going on to win against deep rooted civilizations?

The disruption or innovation was simply religious fanaticism on a scale and ferocity unmatched at the time. Christ was a pacifist and left his followers with that teaching and for the first five hundreds of years of Christianity would be largely splintered and aimless. Mohammed was a warrior who taught his followers not only were wars necessary, but demanded by god to spread the faith.

The Question asks specifically about the first wave of Islamic expansion and dates that too 633 AD under Khalid Ibn Walid. But fails to mention that Mohammed died in June 8, 632 AD and that Mohammed spent the last 10 years of his life fighting wars to unify the Arabian Peninsular and spread Islam. When Mohammed died his followers were already militant and organized for expansion. It was understood wars were synonymous with spreading the faith, and that's how Islam expansion was pursued through conquest. Conquest at the expense of infidels. Christianity too followed this same pattern but not nearly as quickly. Islam was much more focused early on and frankly infinitely more organized.

The battles being discussed in the question were religious wars against infidels. While early Christianity had religious wars. The Emperor Constantine famously used the cross as his standard riding into battle at Milvian Bridge. The difference was the folks fighting for Constantine were not Christians and neither was Constantine until his deathbed. Christians in Constantine's time (Feb 27, 272 AD - May 22, 337 AD) were pacifists not soldiers. Constantine's attempt to recruit Christianity's "fanatics" to Rome's needs thus had very mixed results. Christians weren't unified, Rome spent the first 200 years after elevating Christianity from an underground criminal pursuit to a legal respectable religion, fighting wars against different Christian factions over matters of small doctrine. Early Christians made poor soldiers and their utility to Rome was very mixed. Not so for early Moslems, Mohammed their prophet left them with a blueprint on Islamic expansion and it was about war against non believers.

The largest display of militant Christian fanaticism would be the crusades. Which were a mirror and reaction to Islamic militant religious fanaticism. First Crusade (1095–1099) was a call by Pope Urban II to recapture the holy lands which had fallen to Islam in the 7th century.

So what was Islam's innovation? The ability to touch people, recruit and motivate their soldiers to fight harder and longer than anybody they went up against until perhaps the crusades, but certainly the Mongol invasion of the Caliphate. Then it was lights out.

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