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8 proof reading, corrections
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The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated standard street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (hight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists for them to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated standard street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (hight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated standard street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (hight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists for them to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

7 proof reading, corrections
source | link

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated maximumstandard street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (hight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated maximum street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (hight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated standard street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (hight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

6 proof reading, corrections
source | link

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated maximum street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (Building highthight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated maximum street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (Building hight) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

The maximum building hights are determined by each city (or as in Berlin possible each City District).

In Berlin the first Bebauungsplan (Building Plan) of 1862 regulated maximum street widths of 22 meters and a few years later a general Traufhöhe (hight of roof base) of 5 floors between 21 and 22 meters and a court yard (Hof) of 3.50 meters were introduced.

Since 1700, new areas were mostly build with wider, straight streets. Starting in the 1880s the older areas were bought up by the city and were replaced according to the newer regulations. The last area (Fischerinsel) was done in the 1960's.

Note that "Traufhöhe" is not the total building height, but the height of the lower end of the roof (which gave an upper limit for window heights, which was important for the fire department).

Also the amount of floors depended on the average floor height. Starting in the 1920's and more so in the 1950's lower ceilings became the norm, so that building's with 6 floors are common.

A special Dachgeschoß (a floor within the roof) would not be counted.

The goal was to avoid small, dark, winding streets and allow the fire department to assume the maximum height that in general is needed and that in the court yard an area exists to turn around in.

Exceptions were always (in conjunction with the Fire Department) possible, but until about 10-20 years, seldom

  • Churches, Synagoges were common exceptions

It had nothing to do with churches, but since most churches are higher than 22 meters, that may be the cause of this impression.


Note:

The English version 'Eaves' seems to handel this topic differently than the German language version where Traufhöhe is an extra Sub-Topic.

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