7 replaced http://history.stackexchange.com/ with https://history.stackexchange.com/
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I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in this other answerthis other answer. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in this other answer. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in this other answer. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

6 don't mention other answers by position
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I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in the answer abovethis other answer. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in the answer above. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in this other answer. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

5 fix a typo
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I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in the answer above. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in the answer above. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

I'll look at the economics.

Despite its history of being a Soviet economic powerhouse, the economic state of the DDR was poor. The East German mark was performing badly even in the 1980s. East Germany had a GDP per capita of 6064 DM compared to West Germany's 19 864 DM, p131. Clearly the subsidy the DDR could expect as well as the competent administration they would receive would have been seen as hugely beneficial,as it turned out to be. So East Germany needed West Germany's help, but why did West Germany need East Germany? As you can see from the link at the top of the page it wasn't because they expected it to deliver short term benefits to the West Germany economy.

In that case it seems clear that the benefits to West Germany were instead political benefits, both at home and in terms of international prestige, as mentioned in the answer above. In addition, West Germany had been incorporated into NATO in 1955, and it was probably strategically desirable for its members that East Germany be incorporated into a stable, friendly NATO power (although perhaps this was balanced out be fear of German militarism) (speculative as hell).


Aside:

I've noticed Cyprus has similar issues. Turkey has changed its stance to largely pro-reunification (the analogue of the USSR losing influence), the two sides have few cultural differences, the militants have grown old, etc. The opposition for reunification now comes from the (Greek) Republic of Cyprus. It would seem prosperity makes all the difference when it comes to public support for reunification in the "senior" partner.

4 Typo fixes and other clean-ups. Please avoid inline links and use markdown instead. They make editing a real pain.
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3 added 447 characters in body
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2 added 25 characters in body
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