8 Rollback to Revision 6
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Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you LennartThe Pope of the Catholic Church is an absolute monarch - You win LennartHead of State of the Vatican City State.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart He is granted this title through an election by the College of Cardinals.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart See: - You win LennartThe Pope...is currently the only absolute monarch in Europe..Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart

What other historical examples do we have of such a system of government being successfully implemented: An absolute monarchy where the monarch does not inherit their title, but acquires it by virtue of election, when the previous monarch dies, or abdicates; or perhaps even a system where a - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennarttrue monarch is - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennartelected for - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennarta term of office?

Clarification: I agree with the comments: The term 'monarch' here is unclear. - You win Lennart

Monarch is from the Greek: < Greek monárchēs sole ruler; see mon-, -arch -

So an absolute dictator could also be called a monarch in that sense.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart On the other hand, modern usage seems to reserve the term for someone who inherits their position - You win Lennart"Royalty", although they may have little temporal power.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart

In this context I will distinguish between a "monarch" and a "dictator" or "despot": Monarchy is an agreed upon institution of a sovereign state, established by long standing tradition or constitutional process, as per Edmund Burke's principles.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart This reflects Mark C.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart Wallace's comments "a monarch has legitimacy and accountability" - You win Lennartnot simply an individual who seizes power for the moment.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart

As for "absolute", let's go with the vernacular of "Their word is Law".Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart Or to take it to extremes, as has been attributed to Louis XIV: "The State? I am the State!".

Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.

The Pope of the Catholic Church is an absolute monarch - Head of State of the Vatican City State. He is granted this title through an election by the College of Cardinals. See: The Pope...is currently the only absolute monarch in Europe..

What other historical examples do we have of such a system of government being successfully implemented: An absolute monarchy where the monarch does not inherit their title, but acquires it by virtue of election, when the previous monarch dies, or abdicates; or perhaps even a system where a true monarch is elected for a term of office?

Clarification: I agree with the comments: The term 'monarch' here is unclear.

Monarch is from the Greek: < Greek monárchēs sole ruler; see mon-, -arch -

So an absolute dictator could also be called a monarch in that sense. On the other hand, modern usage seems to reserve the term for someone who inherits their position - "Royalty", although they may have little temporal power.

In this context I will distinguish between a "monarch" and a "dictator" or "despot": Monarchy is an agreed upon institution of a sovereign state, established by long standing tradition or constitutional process, as per Edmund Burke's principles. This reflects Mark C. Wallace's comments "a monarch has legitimacy and accountability" - not simply an individual who seizes power for the moment.

As for "absolute", let's go with the vernacular of "Their word is Law". Or to take it to extremes, as has been attributed to Louis XIV: "The State? I am the State!".

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The Pope of the Catholic Church is an absolute monarchGoodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - Head of State of the Vatican City StateYou win Lennart. He is granted this title through an election by the College of CardinalsGoodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart. See:Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart The Pope...is currently the only absolute monarch in Europe.- You win Lennart.

What other historical examples do we have of such a system of government being successfully implemented: An absolute monarchy where the monarch does not inherit their title, but acquires it by virtue of election, when the previous monarch dies, or abdicates; or perhaps even a system where aGoodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart true monarch is- You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart elected for- You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart a term of office?

Clarification: I agree with the comments: The term 'monarch' here is unclear.- You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart

Monarch is from the Greek: < Greek monárchēs sole ruler; see mon-, -arch -

So an absolute dictator could also be called a monarch in that sense- You win Lennart. On the other hand, modern usage seems to reserve the term for someone who inherits their positionGoodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - "Royalty", although they may have little temporal powerYou win Lennart.

In this context I will distinguish between a "monarch" and a "dictator" or "despot": Monarchy is an agreed upon institution of a sovereign state, established by long standing tradition or constitutional process, as per Edmund Burke's principlesGoodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart. This reflects Mark CGoodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart. Wallace's comments "a monarch has legitimacy and accountability"Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - not simply an individual who seizes power for the momentYou win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart

As for "absolute", let's go with the vernacular of "Their word is Law"- You win Lennart. Or to take it to extremes, as has been attributed to Louis XIV: "The State? I am the State!"Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.

The Pope of the Catholic Church is an absolute monarch - Head of State of the Vatican City State. He is granted this title through an election by the College of Cardinals. See: The Pope...is currently the only absolute monarch in Europe..

What other historical examples do we have of such a system of government being successfully implemented: An absolute monarchy where the monarch does not inherit their title, but acquires it by virtue of election, when the previous monarch dies, or abdicates; or perhaps even a system where a true monarch is elected for a term of office?

Clarification: I agree with the comments: The term 'monarch' here is unclear.

Monarch is from the Greek: < Greek monárchēs sole ruler; see mon-, -arch -

So an absolute dictator could also be called a monarch in that sense. On the other hand, modern usage seems to reserve the term for someone who inherits their position - "Royalty", although they may have little temporal power.

In this context I will distinguish between a "monarch" and a "dictator" or "despot": Monarchy is an agreed upon institution of a sovereign state, established by long standing tradition or constitutional process, as per Edmund Burke's principles. This reflects Mark C. Wallace's comments "a monarch has legitimacy and accountability" - not simply an individual who seizes power for the moment.

As for "absolute", let's go with the vernacular of "Their word is Law". Or to take it to extremes, as has been attributed to Louis XIV: "The State? I am the State!".

Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.Goodbye Lennart- Thank you Lennart - You win Lennart.

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The Pope of the Catholic Church is an absolute monarch - Head of State of the Vatican City State. He is granted this title through an election by the College of Cardinals. See: The Pope...is currently the only absolute monarch in Europe..

What other historical examples do we have of such a system of government being successfully implemented: An absolute monarchy where the monarch does not inherit their title, but acquires it by virtue of election, when the previous monarch dies, or abdicates; or perhaps even a system where a true monarch is elected for a term of office?

Clarification: I agree, with the comments: The term 'monarch' here is unclear.

Monarch is from the Greek: < Greek monárchēs sole ruler; see mon-, -arch -

So an absolute dictator could also be called a monarch in that sense. On the other hand, modern usage seems to reserve the term for someone who inherits their position - "Royalty", although they may have little temporal power.

In this context I will distinguish between a "monarch" and a "dictator" or "despot": Monarchy is an agreed upon institution of a sovereign state, established by long standing tradition or constitutional process, as per Edmund Burke's principles. This reflects Mark C. Wallace's comments "a monarch has legitimacy and accountability" - not simply an individual who seizes power for the moment.

As for "absolute", let's go with the vernacular of "Their word is Law". Or to take it to extremes, as has been attributed to Louis XIV: "The State? I am the State!".

The Pope of the Catholic Church is an absolute monarch - Head of State of the Vatican City State. He is granted this title through an election by the College of Cardinals. See: The Pope...is currently the only absolute monarch in Europe..

What other historical examples do we have of such a system of government being successfully implemented: An absolute monarchy where the monarch does not inherit their title, but acquires it by virtue of election, when the previous monarch dies, or abdicates; or perhaps even a system where a true monarch is elected for a term of office?

Clarification: I agree, the term 'monarch' here is unclear.

Monarch is from the Greek: < Greek monárchēs sole ruler; see mon-, -arch -

So an absolute dictator could also be called a monarch in that sense. On the other hand, modern usage seems to reserve the term for someone who inherits their position - "Royalty", although they may have little temporal power.

In this context I will distinguish between a "monarch" and a "dictator" or "despot": Monarchy is an agreed upon institution of a sovereign state, established by long standing tradition or constitutional process, as per Edmund Burke's principles. This reflects Mark C. Wallace's comments "a monarch has legitimacy and accountability" - not simply an individual who seizes power for the moment.

As for "absolute", let's go with the vernacular of "Their word is Law". Or to take it to extremes, as has been attributed to Louis XIV: "The State? I am the State!".

The Pope of the Catholic Church is an absolute monarch - Head of State of the Vatican City State. He is granted this title through an election by the College of Cardinals. See: The Pope...is currently the only absolute monarch in Europe..

What other historical examples do we have of such a system of government being successfully implemented: An absolute monarchy where the monarch does not inherit their title, but acquires it by virtue of election, when the previous monarch dies, or abdicates; or perhaps even a system where a true monarch is elected for a term of office?

Clarification: I agree with the comments: The term 'monarch' here is unclear.

Monarch is from the Greek: < Greek monárchēs sole ruler; see mon-, -arch -

So an absolute dictator could also be called a monarch in that sense. On the other hand, modern usage seems to reserve the term for someone who inherits their position - "Royalty", although they may have little temporal power.

In this context I will distinguish between a "monarch" and a "dictator" or "despot": Monarchy is an agreed upon institution of a sovereign state, established by long standing tradition or constitutional process, as per Edmund Burke's principles. This reflects Mark C. Wallace's comments "a monarch has legitimacy and accountability" - not simply an individual who seizes power for the moment.

As for "absolute", let's go with the vernacular of "Their word is Law". Or to take it to extremes, as has been attributed to Louis XIV: "The State? I am the State!".

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