6

I can't find it anywhere on the Internet, and I was hoping someone here might know.

  • Are you sure they had warriors that worked for payment? – Sigurd Vojnov May 18 '18 at 20:37
9

The Ancient Egyptians had a great number of ways for saying "soldier". The hieroglyphs that have a significance meaning soldier as a determinative were: enter image description here

Anyway, here's a few words I've found in dictionaries:

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

  • 1
    Just found this myself - well done for beating me to it. – Pieter Geerkens Jun 17 '14 at 4:14
  • @Semaphore: I'm aware this question is really old by now, but if you're still around and have the time I'm curious how you pronounce the word m'sha? And how it differs from msha, the plural? – Era Aug 11 '17 at 19:21
0

The Egyptians had many different words for soldier. Perhaps, the most basic one was "ahati":

ahati (soldier)

The determinative (the guy with the stick) is the symbol you will usually see associated with words involving soldiers or fighting.

  • 1
    Interesting. "Ahati" might mean (roughly) "injurer" or "one who strikes" in many North Indian languages. "Ahata" is 'injured' as well as 'struck'. The opposite "anahata" is the "unstruck vibration" often symbolised by "OM". – Rajib Jun 17 '14 at 3:47

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