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Can someone give me an example of stimulus diffusion from history?

I can't find anything on Google that doesn't have to do with McDonalds.

closed as off-topic by Samuel Russell, congusbongus, lins314159, Semaphore, Mark C. Wallace Sep 8 '14 at 8:17

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  • What is the context in which the term "stimulus diffusion" was used? – Mark C. Wallace Sep 8 '14 at 1:15
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    What does Stimulus diffusion have to do with McDonalds? McDonalds are not mentioned in the linked search. – andy256 Sep 8 '14 at 4:52
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    Actually, McDonalds is commonly referenced as an example of Stimulus Diffusion into India. The "American" McDonalds has many beef products on it's menu. In order for McD's franchises to take hold in India, the franchise owners had to reinvent the menu. If you eat at a McD's in India you can by a Maharaja-Mac, and the menu is chicken, fish, and veggie. It is more appropriately termed cultural diffusion, but numerous university courses use it to explain diffusion, cultural and stimulus. – CGCampbell Sep 8 '14 at 14:43
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According to an American Anthropologist article written by A. L. Kroeger, one example of Stimulus Diffusion would be Chinese Porcelain. In the Sixteenth Century, Chinese Porcelain started coming into Europe. Porcelain had previously been unknown. Over the course of the next two centuries, as more and more people discovered the usefulness of porcelain, the demand was fairly universal throughout Europe. Unfortunately, due to demand and the high cost of importation from China, it was extremely expensive.

European craftsman had to both find the materials and duplicate the processes. The kaolin deposits were found in Germany and the craftsmen invented and perfected the manufacturing processes, enabling relatively inexpensive European porcelain to be made.

Bottom Line Chinese Porcelain was imported into Europe. -> European housewives wanted it. Chinese porcelain was prohibitively expensive. European craftsmen found the materials and invented new processes to manufacture equivalent porcelain. The materials used were not exactly the same and the manufacturing processes were completely new inventions. The output was of comparable quality. -> European Porcelain was now made available.

  • This is incredibly helpful, thank you! – AoiliG Sep 8 '14 at 2:00

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