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When reading about the end of the Tibetan empire, information about the political situation of the area is scarce (most authors focus a lot on the religion).

Basically, who was de facto or de jure in charge of its regions? The buddhist monastic schools?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Maybe I wasnt't too clear, sorry for that. I want to know the political landscape of Tibet at the time. I know there was no single power looming over it, but which were the most influent imperial houses and religious schools?

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    Regional warlords were in charge of their little slices of Tibet. It's not called Era of Fragmentation for no reason. – Semaphore Nov 20 '14 at 16:30
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    Sakya was founded in 1073, amost two hundred years before the capitulation of Tibet to the mongols. With the exception of the Nyingma-Pa (which was apolitical and descentralized), the Sakya-Pa, the Karma-Pa and the Kadam-Pa were involved in politics in 12th century Tibet. Guge and Burang remained as kingdoms well into the 13th century aswell. I find it really hard to find information about the political situation in Tibet because most autheors focus on the religious side of the school leaders. I know Tibet was sparsely populated, but there's literally no info to be found in the usual sources. – Firebug Nov 21 '14 at 16:26
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    @nomadicsquirrel I was writing a bit about it for a project, for which I would need an accurate representation of East Asia and adjacencies in 1130. Basically, I was able to get a detailed description of everything, including governors, revolts and usurpers, but Tibet. – Firebug Feb 9 '15 at 15:47
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    When Nima-gon died around 930AD, Mnah-ris (Ngaris), the Western Tibetan Empire, was divided among his three sons: Pelgyi-gon, the eldest and thus the suzerain over the others, got Manyul (Upper Ladakh), Tashi-gon got Gugé and Purang, and Detsu-gon got Zanskar, Lahul, and Spiti. – Firebug Feb 9 '15 at 15:47
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    Later, Lhachen Utpala (1080-1110), grandson of Pelgyi-gon and the king of Ladakh, vassalized Purig, Purang and Kullu (Lahul-Spiti). Lhachen Nagloka succeeded him (1110-1140) and built the citadel-palaces of Vanala and Khalatse. – Firebug Feb 9 '15 at 15:48
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Made my comments into a provisory and partial answer.

In western Tibet it seems the kingdoms of Guge, Purang, Mar-yul, Yar tse and Zanskar were still around by the 11th century. Couldn't find anything from eastern tibet, unfortunately.

When Nima-gon died around 930AD, Mnah-ris (Ngaris), the Western Tibetan Empire, was divided among his three sons: Pelgyi-gon, the eldest and thus the suzerain over the others, got Manyul (Upper Ladakh), Tashi-gon got Gugé and Purang, and Detsu-gon got Zanskar, Lahul, and Spiti.

Later, Lhachen Utpala (1080-1110), grandson of Pelgyi-gon and the king of Ladakh, vassalized Purig, Purang and Kullu (Lahul-Spiti).

You can get most of that info if you follow the timeline in Buddhist Western Himalaya: A politico-religious history

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