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Where were the first and last countries that abolished flogging as a punishment?

Edit: I hadn't seen the wiki articles below. Very interesting much don't go into much detail about non-Anglophone countries.

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The punishment was abolished in the Royal Navy in 1879

"In the United Kingdom, JCP generally was abolished in 1948;[62] however, it persisted in prisons as a punishment for prisoners committing serious assaults on prison staff (ordered by prison's visiting justices) until it was abolished by s 65 (Abolition of corporal punishment in prison) of the Criminal Justice Act 1967 (the last ever prison flogging was in 1962)." see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judicial_corporal_punishment#United_Kingdom

http://www.corpun.com/counukj.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flagellation

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In Russia the biggest part of corporal punishments (including, say, branding) was abolished only in 1863 as part of reforms by Alexander II.

Yet flogging still existed until XX century as punishment for prisoners, soldiers, peasants and vagabonds.

The latter was abolished in 1904 by the last Russian emperor Nikolai II (except the punishment for prisoners). And even then, in the time of WWI the flogging was revived again in Russian army. So the full abolishment of flogging in Russia is only after October Revolution 1917.

Wiki: Телесные наказания в России

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    One can argue that flogging in Russia was and is practiced to this day, although not-quite-officially. Corporal punishment and torture are being routinely practiced by Russian law enforcement; although they are not officially prescribed, the policy seems to be to conceal instances of torture and, if publicly discovered, to refuse filing charges against those responsible. In rare cases where the body of evidence is overwhelming criminal cases are filed, but quickly dismissed on technicalities. I'm not quoting evidence here because googling it is rather straightforward. – Michael Oct 30 '15 at 20:42
  • @Michael "Unofficial" tortures are practised in all the countries of the world (cf. Guantanamo). Still it has no connection to the laws. Also it's not about "flogging", anyway. – Matt Oct 31 '15 at 7:52

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