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I don't know whether this is a myth, but I've run into this in various publications, and a few Egyptians I know personally have confirmed it: that the Egyptians of today and those who lived in the times of the Pharaohs are genetically identical.

Unlike their neighbors. Whatever Mediterranean state you take, the denizens' DNA will attest to all the migrations their country has witnessed over the past 4000 years or so. In Libya, next door to Egypt, the average citizen will have strains of Sub-Saharan, Greek, Roman, and Arab DNA. Sicilians have Norman blood in their veins, and Greeks have Turkish. And so forth. The Egyptians seem to be an exception: they don't mix with others. At least not genetically. Is this true, and if it is, how do they even manage it?

I mean, they fought all those wars with the Nubians; they once had a large population of Hebrew slaves; they lived under Persian, Greek, and Roman occupation - centuries upon centuries; and then there were the Caliphs; and the Brits; and - nothing? Not a trace? How can that be?

closed as off-topic by Semaphore, Mark C. Wallace, Steve Bird, CGCampbell, Gwen Nov 6 '15 at 1:08

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    Could you provide some references? Actually I used to think that modern Egyptians are mostly of Arabic origin. – Matt Nov 5 '15 at 11:37
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    Any statement that includes "genetically identical" is suspect - only twins are identical. I'm going to reject that statement unless you introduce some mechanism to compare two sets of genetic population and define "identical" - is every Egyptian today the identical twin of a historical Egyptian? Are they all clones and we haven't noticed? – Mark C. Wallace Nov 5 '15 at 12:46
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    It sounds more like one of those national myths that everyone learn in school/ hear at home and 100% sure it is true - and it is just pure BS propaganda. – Greg Nov 5 '15 at 15:42
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    Notably, their name for the country is Misr not any phonetical variation of Egypt in the local language (Arabic). It says something, doesn't it? – kubanczyk Nov 5 '15 at 16:36
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As you pointed out, your basic premise is wrong. There is nothing "homogenous" about the Egyptians. Just for starters, centuries of Arab conquest changed that. Even in ancient times the Egyptians had different ethnic groups living in different parts of the country, and the ethnicity of the royal family and nobility was considered different altogether.

In modern Egypt the Copts, a Christian people, are considered to be descendants of the ancient (Roman) Egyptians and Alexandrians, not the Arabs who are muslims. Speaking of Alexandria, it is worth noting that the Greeks ruled Egypt for many centuries and there was a huge diaspora to Egypt out of Judea in Roman times.

In Medieval times the Byzantine Greeks and the Turks both occupied and ruled Egypt, creating their own sub cultures and ethnic groups.

So, whoever told you that the Egyptians are "homogenous" or somehow descended from the pharoahs or whatever, has no idea what they they are talking about.

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