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The trend of Millenials "boomeranging" home, or never leaving in the first place is much-reported-upon, and much lamented, here, for example.

Is this a new trend, or merely a reversion to pre-WWII customs (the link cites 1940 as a comparable circumstance)? I agree that delaying marriage, per se, was not part of the practice, but wasn't it typical for unmarried women (I'm peeling off young men from this question) to live with their families?

As a user noted below, obviously the article confirms the statistical fact here; I'm looking for a broader historical context.

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    Doesn't that article already answer this question? "[In 1940] 36.2 percent of young women lived with relatives ... Among young men, 42.8 percent were living with relatives last year, below the 1940 high of 47.5 percent. 'The result is a striking U-shaped curve for young women - and young men - indicating a return to the past, statistically speaking.'" What are you asking? – Semaphore Nov 12 '15 at 17:09
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    I'd say that the article is one data point, which sparked my interest. I guess I'm asking for a broader historical context that the article hints at. – Chris B. Behrens Nov 12 '15 at 17:51
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    Can you update the question to indicate that you're looking for broader historical context, rather than simple confirmation of the statistical fact? – Mark C. Wallace Nov 12 '15 at 18:05
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    Why do you mean by "old costumes"? Do you think they are waiting for some guy to marry them so the man can bring income and the woman handles home & the kids? How would fit in that scenario that 27% of young women are enrolled in university, and that they delayed marrying? Have you read and understood the article you linked? – SJuan76 Nov 12 '15 at 18:48
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    Customs, not costumes....And the question carefully avoids the interpretation, it merely asks whether unmarried women living at home is a cultural norm. Is there a norm? What is the norm? What are the causes of the U shaped curve? – Mark C. Wallace Nov 12 '15 at 19:50