2

I understand that their function was for munitions storage, but according to Wikipedia, the Army Corps of Engineers just up and started building the Manlinta Tunnels in 1922.

What was happening in that part of the world in 1922 that, without support from congress, they started building them?

Note: I'm not asking what they were built for (storage), but why then & there?

3

It is because Corregidor is dominated by Alas-Asin at the end of the Bataan. Anyone controlling Alas-Asin can easily shell all of Corregidor. Originally the US fortress on Corregidor (Fort Mills) had only surface fortifications, but the Army realized that the fort was completely vulnerable to a shore bombardment. Therefore, to make the fort a "self-sufficient" bastion, the tunnels were dug, potentially allowing the US forces on the island to resist a siege, at least temporarily. These preparations later proved to be very useful, because the island was able to hold out against the Japanese for four months during World War II.

  • Thanks! +1, but what's the back story that they just did it themselves there on the island, and not as direction from the government? – Mikey Jan 13 '16 at 19:52
  • 1
    Ah, the United States Army is the government, that's why its called the United States Army, not the Green Mountain Hillbilly Militia. As far as getting specific funding for that particular project from Congress, I think they did get some special funds later in the 1920s, but they weren't going to wait around for Congress to act. Congress does not advise the military on warfare strategy, its the other way around. – Tyler Durden Jan 13 '16 at 20:12

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